Nicole Parker, Ph.D.

Nicole Parker, Ph.D., earned an undergraduate degree in economics and completed her graduate work in cancer biology and pharmacology.
While in graduate school, Ms. Parker became interested in the field of medical communication. After a brief period as a freelance medical editor, she joined a medical communications company, where she continues as a medical writer today.

Book Reviews by Nicole Parker, Ph.D.

Reviewed by: 

“Informed decision making is crucial for those in positions of responsibility—such as politicians who may influence scientific and environmental policy. Mr.

Reviewed by: 

“an intelligently written look into why most people take an optimistic view of life. . . . stimulating discussion . . . in easily understood language . . .

Reviewed by: 

“Grabbing the reader from the start with a brief introduction to human evolution and anthropology, author Dunn moves through the answer to these and other questions with a sure use of langu

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“It is a rare author who can translate complex concepts into concrete and understandable portions for any reader to understand; yet this is exactly what Ian Mr.

Reviewed by: 

A Hard Death by Jonathan Hayes was a book unlike than those I normally review—an utterly different experience from science and health-related nonfiction; nonetheless, this mystery novel dr

Author(s):
Other Contributors:
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Doctors Are More Harmful Than Germs is an alternative medicine book proposing that modern evidence-based medicine, and surgery in particular, is counterproductive to the body’s own powers

Reviewed by: 

Few books deftly yet thoroughly cover a wide range of topics in a single volume; The Emperor of All Maladies is undoubtedly one of these rare books.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Spider Silk: Evolution and 400 Million Years of Spinning, Waiting, Snagging, and Mating is an interesting, well-researched book about the history and development of spiders.

Reviewed by: 

Scientific Characters chronicles the events of “Datagate,” in which a prominent breast cancer researcher and oncologist falsified patient data in a landmark clinical trial.

Reviewed by: 

 Ecklund sent surveys, each containing $15, to professors and researchers of the natural and social sciences at various elite higher-education institutions across the United States.