9–12

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Rudy, a naively determined and enthusiastically optimistic tree frog, joins the ranks of SpongeBob and Dory as Brian Smith and Mike Raicht team up to deliver another fun and adventurous graphic nov

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“African folktales always invite us to talk about how characters behave,” writes acclaimed author Beverley Naidoo in the foreword to her latest title, a patchy collection of stories hailing from ni

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Middle school readers will love the Alcatraz series, of which Alcatraz Versus the Evil Librarians is the first title, originally published in 2007 and rereleased in 2016.

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“Maybe the Vinny you used to know isn’t quite gone. If she’s still in there, you thank her, silently. And say goodbye.”

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Ever wondered about the birth of movies? In 1895 the Lumière brothers invented the Cinematograph.

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Spencer Quinn’s new book is Woof, and Woof is a delightful contribution to children’s literature. Quinn has written a book that is bound to become a classic.

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“Stephen Tomecek and Fred Harper together succeed in making Earth science fun.”

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“Middle-school girls with a fanciful flair will snap up this novel . . .”

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a real treat for children and adults who love to learn about dinosaurs.”

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“How would it feel to hide an enormous, important, life threatening secret from your friends, your neighbors, and maybe even members of your own family?”

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“Alien Encounter is a chapter book with plenty of mystery, quirky characters, some chills, and on-target, male-skewed humor for the elementary school set.”

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The Junction of Sunshine and Lucky offers a gentle, inspiring story of economically disadvantaged people uniting to assert their right to define beauty on their own terms.”

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Sometimes there’s no explaining how a person manages to work his or her way into your heart. It just happens.

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Many people wonder about answers to some of life’s most basic questions, such as “Why the sky is blue?”, which can be answered from textbooks and in science classrooms and seem geared to younger, m

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Cynthia Voigt’s first book in a three-book series Mister Max: The Book of Lost Things is written in the same style as Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events.

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“. . . a beautiful love story told in spare, riveting prose.”

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In 1946, a young orphan from Poland arrives at a New York yeshiva where he will study and live.

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“For a parent looking to broaden a child’s understanding of the world, this new graphic novel is a find.”

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“Mr. MacHale is a master of intrigue, pacing, and adventure.”

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“Rick Yancey has written a very different book from the usual alien invasion story. . . . explor[ing] the very nature of humanity . . . creepy good.”

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“Papercutz has added a significant new dimension to the legend of Nancy Drew. She and her new Clue Crew should be around for a long time.”

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“Liar and Spy is a worthwhile read . . .”

Rebecca Stead covers a lot of ground in her new middle grade mystery Liar and Spy.

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“Mr. Oppel is an expert storyteller and an outstanding world builder.”

When writing about the supernatural, authors need to follow the rules.

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“Resplendent with the vivid hues of its characters’ hopes and sorrows, The Humming Room gives young readers a compelling tale that does justice to its evergreen inspiration.”

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