African American

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What should “A Reader” attempt to do? One looks for it to provide an overview of an author’s work. The reader is a book that should be suitable for the classroom and instruction.

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“Ladee Hubbard has written a celebration of family, as well as of the individual.”

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"skillfully woven . . ."

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"an entertaining, engaging crime novel."

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“Given the recent happenings in Charlottesville, Virginia, it’s hard to imagine a more relevant release date for this lovely, important book. This is a book for our time.”

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“Clemmons’ voice is natural and appealing . . . and . . . what she is telling us is powerfully poignant and emotional, even at times, devastatingly resonant. . . .

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“a love story that is also a survival story of beauty and hope.”

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The Life and Times of Persimmon Wilson is a startling novel following the life of Persimmons Wilson, a former slave that fights in the Civil War, only to be imprisoned and hanged once he o

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“You need not be a bird lover or watcher to enjoy this book, but there’s a good chance you will love both birds and life more by its end.”

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One could compare the artistic career of Clarence Major to that of musical genius Miles Davis. Major has always been miles ahead of other African American writers.

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This thought-provoking novel is set in the years just after the Civil War.

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The 1920s is one of those decades everyone seems to look back at with fascination and nostalgia.

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quickly read but not easily forgotten. It’s a lovely story . . .”

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“warm and funny, touching in unpredictable chapters, and filled with McMillan’s signature snappy dialogue and salty inner monologue.”

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“Chasing the North Star is an epic journey, vividly detailed, acutely satisfying, and ultimately hopeful.”

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Kaitlyn Greenidge’s debut about family, race, and eugenics is a haunting coming-of-age novel.

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Set in the late 80s, Jed has escaped Chicago and the beginning of the AIDS crisis to return to where he experienced a hedonist paradise during his college days.

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This novel is as finely tuned as the best banjo played by 19-year-old runaway slave Henry Sims.

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It’s not every day you get a PI book sent to you for reviewing written by an actual authentic-to-the-bone private investigator, so I was really intrigued and looking forward to reading this debut n

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“perfect for young children just learning America’s history, long-time history buffs, and readers who love a stroll down memory lane . . .”

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"Balm is a powerful tale of individual loves, longings, and losses . . ."

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“. . . deserves to be read in its enchanting entirety before the inevitable movie deal comes to pass.”

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“Edward Kelsey Moore knows how to write a terrific, complex, believable, and always intriguing story.”

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“There’s no need to tell an abbreviation of Walter Mosley’s story here. If the reader wants a complicated and well-told mystery, it’s here.

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“. . . brilliant and gritty and urban . . . the most brutal coming of age story imaginable.”

The Kid is by far the most disturbing novel I have ever read.

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