William Speir

William Speir was born in Birmingham, Alabama, in 1962. He has been a management consultant and leader for almost 25 years, specializing in the human impact to change. Whether this change is as simple as the introduction of new technology into an organization or as complex as a major restructuring of a company's operations, the way people work and interact with each other is impacted. For a change to succeed, people have to be prepared for that change. This has been Mr. Speir’s focus for most of his professional career.

He has worked for companies and with clients across the United States, Canada, Bermuda, and the United Kingdom.

He is a published author of several articles and publications on leadership and the human impact on change.

He is also a published author of several textbooks on the types, nomenclature, capabilities and deployment of field artillery in the 19th century. He teaches artillery safety to Civil War Reenactors as part of the Instructor Cadre of the Loyal Train of Artillery Chapter of the United States Field Artillery Association Artillery Schools, which use the textbooks that William wrote.

Mr. Speir has helped start a number of nonprofit corporations, and holds officer and director positions in several cultural and historic organizations.

Mr. Speir resides in Florida with his wife, Lee Anne. He has two children (Sonya and Brad), and a cat named “Major” (a gray Maine Coon named for Major John Pelham, J. E. B. Stuart’s chief of artillery).

The Order of the Saltier Trilogy is William's first serious work of fiction, and reflects his fascination with secret societies, knights, and orders of knighthood throughout the ages.

Books Authored

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“William Speir’s skills as a storyteller are growing exponentially with each new book. Once again I heartily recommend this to pulp fans looking for a new twist on action-adventure prose.

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In the past five years, since I started to examine and review the pulp genre field, it soon became clear that there were only two really different types of pulp stories.