Kenneth Allard

Kenneth Allard is a former U.S. Army Colonel widely known to national audiences. Entering military service as a draftee, his unique career included overseas service as a Cold War intelligence officer and assignments as an assistant professor at West Point, special assistant to the Army Chief of Staff, and Dean of Students at the National War College. For more than a decade, he was a featured military analyst on the networks of NBC News, particularly MSNBC and CNBC.

That experience provided the backdrop for his most recent book, Warheads: Cable News and the Fog of War. His other books include Command, Control and the Common Defense, winner of the 1991 National Security Book Award.

Colonel Allard holds a doctorate from the Fletcher School of Law & Diplomacy and an MPA from Harvard University. His numerous military decorations include the Defense Superior Service Medal, two awards of the Legion of Merit and the NATO Expeditionary Medal for service in Bosnia. In November 2009 he was awarded the Silver Citizenship Medal by the National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution.

Book Reviews by Kenneth Allard

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“. . . [a] notable achievement.”

Luke McCalinn’s first novel The Man from Berlin (A Gregor Reinhardt Novel) is nothing if not ambitious.

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“. . . troubling enough to crowd mourners’ benches all across the nation.”

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Just in time for Memorial Day, Ralph Peters has written another landmark of historical fiction with Hell or Richmond, the second novel in his current Civil War series.

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“While ten years might seem like an endless expanse in the right-now-don’t-wait realm of all forms of new media, a decade pales in comparison to a lifetime—or to eternity.”

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“. . . the author lays out a history few Americans know and some barely even suspect. . . .

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Like a Virgin works because of the author’s characteristic irreverence, self-mocking humor, breezy style, and utter refusal to hide behind standard CEO-speak.”

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“. . . [a] scathing overall assessment of Mr. Obama’s leadership . . .”

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Bottom line first: I cannot recommend Mr. Sanger’s Confront and Conceal to New York Journal of Books readers—or anyone else.

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“Stephen Carter turns out to be a surprisingly good writer . . .”

What if Abraham Lincoln had somehow survived assassination at the end of the Civil War?

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“. . . hilarious . . . scathing critiques of American political elites and their reigning conceits.”

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“. . . a classic for the ages, a supremely truthful look at the horrors of war and a battle that shaped who we became as a people.

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“Colonel Russell’s cleanly constructed narrative is so exact—down to names, places, dates, and events— that it must have come directly from his unit’s combat journals and personnel rosters,

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“. . . the rest of us should take Mark Bowden’s warnings with the utmost seriousness because of the growing threats to our wired world.

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“. . . from the book’s inception, In My Time: A Personal and Political Memoir was designed to invite controversy and to out-shout any review. . . . If Mr.

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“Hmmm, maybe we could both go and strangle your boss? . . .

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“James O’Shea has written an important book for anyone concerned about the future of journalism, its uncertain relationship to modern democratic societies, and the eternal balance between f

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Mike Huckabee is running: to Fox News studios in New York, to his media center in Arkansas, to his new home in Florida—and back again.

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Donald Rumsfeld will certainly be delighted that, at the start of his fifth year in post-public life, he remains as controversial as the day he left.

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With the long wars in Iraq and Afghanistan now taking their place in our military-historical tradition, three new books emerged this summer.

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With the long wars in Iraq and Afghanistan now taking their place in our military-historical tradition, three new books emerged this summer.

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With the long wars in Iraq and Afghanistan now taking their place in our military-historical tradition, three new books emerged this summer.

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Just as they do on “Dancing With the Stars,” let’s begin with the positives.

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What is it like to get shot in combat, to feel your life draining away and know there is nothing you can do to help yourself?