Nonfiction

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Norman Doidge’s book, The Brain That Changes Itself, helps to usher in a new branch of brain science called neuroplasticity.

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 “All I wanted to do in this book was to sell you
on being the artist you already are.”

 

Naked honesty is becoming—a rare and beautiful fashion, suited perfectly to the mind of a writer.

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“If the man doesn’t believe as we do, we say he is a crank, and that settles it. I mean, it does nowadays, because now we can’t burn him.” —Mark Twain

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There was a time, up until the early 1980s, when someone of relatively modest means could, if interested, buy the great wines of Burgundy, the grand crus and premier crus, on a fairly regular basis

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With multinational corporations firmly ensconced as the evil raptors of our economy, small businesses have now become the red, white, and blue of a new commercial patriotism.

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Spider Silk: Evolution and 400 Million Years of Spinning, Waiting, Snagging, and Mating is an interesting, well-researched book about the history and development of spiders.

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For parents of children with autism, life is filled with intense scheduling—visits to doctors’ offices, occupational, physical and speech therapies, that side trip to the natural foods grocer for t

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This will be an instant classic. If you are a designer you should beg, borrow, buy or steal this book (as a reviewer, I got it for free).

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The title of Millicent Borges Accardi’s poetry chapbook, Woman on a Shaky Bridge, does not come from any of the lines of the 16 poems in this collection but rather from its preface, which

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Few of us who live “in the lower 48” have any idea about what it is like to live in Alaska.

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Andrew Ross Sorkin has written what many consider the definitive book on both Lehman Brothers and the financial crisis.

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 When The Wisdom of Bees first arrived in my mailbox, I greeted it with a bit of trepidation, thinking that this was going to be another business book shoehorned into a contrived theme.

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The cover is striking, a rich blue, defining a solitary cloud.

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In The Pox and the Covenant, Tony Williams challenges readers to reevaluate everything they thought they knew about colonial America, the Puritans, and science.

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Being a dad is just about the easiest thing in the world. It’s merely a matter of placing some sperm in the right place at the right time.

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This novel is a real-time, disturbing blitzkreig. It is also an important, exhausting, and challenging book about our army during today’s conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan.

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Ian Bremmer ought to have an easy time proving his basic premise: “only genuine free markets can generate broad, sustainable, long-term prosperity.” Yet he fails.

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“It’s laissez-faire until you get in deep shit.” This is how Michael Lewis ends his latest book, The Big Short. This pretty much sums up his feelings and how the book unfolds.

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Memo to: Messrs. O’Reilly & Tennant

From: Your Book Reviewer

I read your book.

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(Wiley, February 2010 )

 

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How timely, that on the day I began reading this excellent book, in mid-January 2002, the weekly magazine Science News included an article whose headline was “Record Science Budget Evaded

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The more appropriate title for this book would be “A Love Letter” from the Edge of the Catwalk.

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