Nonfiction

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Gerbert d’Aurillac’s life as a monk, mathematician, scientist, and spy spanned a turbulent time in European history. Europe in the year 1000 A.C.E.

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World of Wonders is an amazing voyage through stunning images that depict life and planet Earth in its most natural and awe-inspiring form.

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The Writer’s Guide to Psychology is on a mission. Its title tells it all.

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Is the term “nervous breakdown” an accurate description of what can happen to someone under stress and who might be struggling with a major depression or panic attacks?

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Unless you’ve been living on another planet for the past few years, you know that social media and social marketing are now the Greatest Thing Since Sliced Bread.

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Reading Ezra Pound can be a demanding experience as he often slips into French, Spanish, Italian, or ancient Greek—using the Greek alphabet of course.

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I don’t know. I am torn over The Secret World of Slugs and Snails: Life in the Very Slow Lane. On the one hand, it is an encyclopedia of snail and slug information.

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For the past four hundred years, Galileo, Siderius nuncius, and Galileo’s subsequent trial at the Inquisition have been used in many contexts to tell many types of stories.

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As we end the year, serious business readers (which outnumber frivolous scanners two to one, according to my statistics) have crumpled face first into a long winter’s nap.

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To his loved ones who gathered about him as he lay on his deathbed in 1833, actor Edmund Kean famously said, “Dying is easy, comedy is hard.”

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As an analyst and analysand, who since her unconventional childhood has meditated and studied Buddhism, Pilar Jennings brings her professional expertise and personal experience into this rewarding,

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George W. Bush’s Decision Points is a memoir of his eight-year presidency.

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The inside cover flap of Life, the much-anticipated memoir by Keith Richards, carries a note, in Richards’ handwriting: “This is the Life.

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Trungpa Rinpoche’s controversial “crazy wisdom” methods of cutting through “spiritual materialism” to penetrate the superficially captivated, shopping-mall mentality of his Western audiences with t

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Popular psychology books seem to always sell big. In many large bookstores they have their own section labeled self-help or psychology.

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Leonard Bernstein was not a classically beautiful man. He was not the type of person to be featured on the cover of GQ or Vogue.

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There is something wonderful about a book that is unafraid of its footnotes.

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This 301-page book is an examination of what happens to a human body after death.

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Six thousand entries on language, folklore, history, and myth enliven these 800-odd pages, edited by Seán McMahon from Derry and Kerry-born, Dublin-based Jo O’Donoghue with additional editing by Ma

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In a crime investigation, a police detective usually asks, “Who had the means, motive, and the opportunity to commit this crime?” In the book Profiling: The Psychology of Catching Killers,

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Maya Angelou’s lovely books usually reside on our bedside tables, yet this is one you’ll keep close at hand in the kitchen.

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Unlike most “fashion designer driven” volumes, this book actually speaks in the designer’s voice as well as from the perspectives of other celebrated figures from within the fashion community.

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Edmund White, who will turn 70 in 2010, is the grand old man of American gay literature.

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From its overheated title to its Big Journalism authors, it would be easy to dismiss All the Devils Are Here: The Hidden History of the Financial Crisis as the latest financial-crisis widg

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