Nonfiction

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 What could be a more contentious issue today than the conflict surrounding our border with Mexico?

 

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“. . . the lonely were more likely to have died than the nonlonely.”

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Ladybug Girl at the Beach is a delightful story about conquering fear of the unknown.

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While she was the pastry chef at The French Laundry, Claire Clark wrote Indulge in 2007; now released in paperback, the book remains a must-have.

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For all the dyspepsia induced by the Great Recession, Niall Ferguson, one of our best economic historians, has offered us a tonic: a biography not of a dealer, trader, or hedger, but rather a b

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Cecil B. DeMille was one of the first true giants of the American film industry. His bigger than life persona has inspired author Eyman to attempt a bigger than life portrait.

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“Insurance is the great protector of the American middle class, but only when it works.” Jay Feinman’s premise is that the property and casualty insurance industry is a profit seeking one that make

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 Wendy Richmond has put together a swirling assortment of ideas, observations, tips, philosophy, quotes, and anecdotes about art.

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Dog stories are meant to tug at the heartstrings. But A Man and His Maniac: The Bunkie Story does so in a down-to-earth way.

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Most of us know someone who could use a little basic instruction in the kitchen: a college student or recent graduate living in his/her first apartment, a newly single adult, a neighbor, a friend o

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Are geniuses born or made? Is there such a thing as natural talent? Are some people born with more talent and ability than others? For as long as most of us can recall, the premise of nature vs.

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Science depends on the ability of experiments and observations made out in the world to be repeatable by other observers.

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It is known as the “Death Zone”—the part of a mountain that punches above 26,000 feet.

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Max Planck, certainly one of the fathers of modern physics, and arguably the dean of theoretical physics in Germany at the turn of the 20th century, was a famously decent man whose association was

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The Lost Years by Kristina Wandzilak (daughter), and Constance Curry (mother), is the raw and touching story of a family that endures unimaginable hardships in an attempt to save their dau

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 (Little, Brown and Company, September 2006) The Beautiful Fall has been classified “pop culture” but it is more much a chronicle of the parallel lives of two of the most famous designers of

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John Paul Stevens: An Independent Life by Bill Barnhart and Gene Schlickman is a scholarly and well-researched book about one of the United States Supreme Court’s most memorable justices.

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Well over a year passed between the publication of Niall Ferguson’s The Ascent of Money in hardcover and the paperback text reviewed here.

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As a follow-up to his wildly successful Duct Tape Marketing, John Jantsch’s newest book, The Referral Engine, manages to build on his previous success with a book that is not only

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In her memoir, My Life in France, Julia Child wrote, “One of the secrets, and pleasures, of cooking is to learn to correct something if it goes awry; and one of the lessons is to grin and bear it i

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If you are a reader of Maxim, then Gillian Telling’s name may be familiar since she is their sex columnist.

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There’s something delightfully intrusive about peering into the lives of literary heroes of the past, reading their private correspondence and conducting forensic examinations of their everyday liv

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