Nonfiction

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There was a turning point in author Cameron Alborzian’s life when he decided to change his role in the material world forever.

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Many books endure by telling you about the Buddha, but this is one of the few telling you in his own words. Recorded by his followers, these discourses survived in the ancient Pali language.

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This anthology compiles sayings of over two dozen lamas, past and present. Following the naturally emerging path into Buddhist practice, Reginald A.

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A book about Einstein for preschoolers? How scary, right? Not at all!

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Let’s get the easy part out of the way: I highly recommend The Quiet World: Saving Alaska’s Wilderness Kingdom (1879–1960) by Rice University history professor Douglas Brinkley.

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“To rest in the present is a state of magical simplicity, although attainment of this state is not as simple as it sounds.”

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Some books are designed for a mass audience and these are frequently works of fiction. Most nonfiction books (as this work is) unfortunately, appeal to a smaller readership.

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A marked shift has occurred in the tone and assumptions surrounding our national fortune.

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Failing Grade: Oregon’s Higher Education System Goes Begging is a collection of articles by The Oregonian’s chief political columnist David Sarasohn, which appeared in print durin

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How would a five-year-old boy experience the birth of Jesus?

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The novel Anna Karenina may have been analyzed from every literary and historical viewpoint imaginable, but has anyone calculated how much richer Anna would have been if she’d dumped her h

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My Penguin Osbert In Love is a delightful story filled with friendship, devotion, and love. My Penguin Osbert In Love is the second book in this series.

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It’s probably a good thing that when Louis Armstrong sang, “A kiss is just a kiss,” Sheril Kirshenbaum’s The Science of Kissing had not been published.

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Maps and Mapping is a breakdown of various maps that are seen and used on a daily basis and some that are used to find information in different ways.

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On the heels of her first offering, Going Rogue, Sarah Palin follows with a series of essays offering her unvarnished and unapologetic opinions on Family, Faith and Flag, includin

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Listener’s guide.

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In Smarter, Faster, Cheaper: Non-Boring, Fluff-Free Strategies for Marketing and Promoting Your Business, author David Siteman Garland seems to be having a conversation with himself (const

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Fate, Time, and Language is a collection of monographs whose subject is a study of the validity of fatalism from the perspective of the use of logic practiced by philosophers.

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Imagine, if you will, that our government wants more business growth in, say, lower Manhattan. It issues a charter to a worthy company—how about Goldman Sachs, for the sake of argument?

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One Size Does Not Fit All: Diversity in the Classroom is a collection of essays written by 23 education professionals ranging from teachers (including a National Teacher of the Year finali

Death and sex are literature’s subjects, not science’s. What we care most about is what these subjects mean to us—not what they, in fact, are.

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The Food Substitutions Bible does not, at first glance, look like a book to snuggle under the covers with and read for a while.

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The cover of Scott Gerber’s first book, Never Get a “Real” Job: How to Dump Your Boss, Build a Business, and Not Go Broke, has two hands making air quotes around the word “Real.” That give

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