Nonfiction

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What makes Loose Girl moving is the sheer amount of tragic honesty Cohen puts on the pages.

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How to Master Your Muck by Kathi Burns hits everything on the checklist for a well-designed book. A “how-to” title? Check.

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Nat Geo Amazing! is an awe-inspiring collection of human culture, animal oddities, and true tales of wonder.

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The Artificial Ape is a book with a plausible idea, but that is all it has.

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“I have always preferred,” wrote the French 19th century author Anatole France, “the folly of passion to the wisdom of indifference.”

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The United States is one of the most religious “first world” nations.

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There are many ways to define “kosher.” The Hebrew root of the word simply means fit—food that is fitting for Jews to eat.

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Academy Award-winner Angelina Jolie is one of the most intriguing actresses of this generation—an adoptive parent, UN ambassador, and partner to one of Hollywood’s biggest heartthrobs.

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It's not often we get to hear the story from the victim of a serial killer as we do in this sensitively written account of Sanford Clark, the nephew of serial killer Gordon Stewart Northcott.

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Editor of New Left Review, London-based Ali criticizes Barack Obama’s obedience to the same corporate and military powers that controlled previous American administrations.

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Rick Hodes grew up on Long Island. There was nothing in his background to suggest that he would become a doctor who devoted his life to some of the sickest and poorest souls on our planet.

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Experienced journalist Fran Hawthorne creates an absolutely relatable, if not always easily readable, book.

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Not every programmer may be a scientific programmer, but all programmers will at some point have to deal with correctness, efficiency, and requirements changes, and some may have to deal with float

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 (Bantam Dell, May 2009) In the nature vs. nurture argument, Daniel Coyle comes down firmly on the side of nurture, and makes a compelling case. Mr.

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Jaron Lanier, an early developer of Virtual Reality, presents his manifesto, his state-of-the-union address of the cultural impact of the Internet and the Web. He has been prescient in the past.

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In 1990 Wall Street Journal reporters Bryan Burrough and John Helyar wrote Barbarians at the Gate, the account of the leveraged buyout of RJR Nabisco.

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Jason Siff advises “what to do when the instructions get in the way.” That is, for both beginning and experienced meditation students, he encourages practitioners to relax.

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Cockroaches will endure after the final mushroom cloud disappears; similarly, the financial industrial complex—the economists, traders, bankers, regulators, and journalists—will continue to try to

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IIn the small town where I live, not so many years ago conservative religious groups raised a ruckus when the local school board proposed adding yoga to the district’s physical education curriculum

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Although The New Rules of Marketing and PR is an update of the 2007 first edition book of the same name, it can also be considered as a sequel to Jay Conrad Levinson’s seminal Guerilla

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 Communication has been described as being what a person hears, not what another  person says.

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Mr. Mortimer has brought to the study of the American Civil War the biography of Pryce Lewis.

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The notion of choosing is so complex that there are now two popular books on the subject. Each was written by an author who is an expert in their field of study.

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Take a quick skim through Supper for a Song, and your first thought may be, “Wow, songs sure must cost more in Britain.” This book will pull readers in with its attractive layout and photo

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