Writing & Journalism

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Writing a book, any book, is a journey.

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“. . . will empower you to give the technique a try.”

Barbara Abercrombie has packed her extensive knowledge into an exercise book for writers.

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“Ms. Goldberg pushes the reader past fear and doubt into a glorious empowerment . . .”

The road to good writing does not proceed in a straight line.

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“To Show and to Tell: The Craft of Literary Nonfiction provides clues as to how one might aspire to write the way Mr. Lopate does.”

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“All writers, seasoned or newbie, should read, absorb, and put to use the lessons Don McNair offers . . .”

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“. . . learn to express yourself in a language that is in alignment with your true nature.”

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“. . . [a] worthwhile addition to any word-lover’s book shelf.”

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“. . . an honest portrayal of the battles of a few meant to benefit not only themselves but those who came after them.”

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“You will be inspired and encouraged to write your way toward the inherent power of your story—becoming a better writer in the process.”

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“In moments like this, the reader wishes that Ms.

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“In Mr. Rowse’s opinion, what we may be losing in terms of linguistic perfection is actually leading us to communicate more and thus to greater understanding between people.

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Newspaperman is part memoir, part history. . . .

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“in Ms. Ciuraru’s talented hands, these assembled brief tales of authors’ lives . . . make for what can only truthfully be called ravishing reading. . . .

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You may wonder what a stylebook is.

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Tiny Terror: Why Truman Capote (Almost) Wrote Answered Prayers is a victim of what might be called “the curse of a beautiful face.” Or, more precisely, the curse of a beautiful title.

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The first edition of The Everything Guide to Writing Children’s Books was published in 2002.

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James Geary’s latest book on the nuances of the English language is called I Is an Other: The Secret Life of Metaphor and How It Shapes the Way We See the World.

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Ralph Keyes begins his book, Euphemania: Our Love Affair with Euphemisms, with a rather dull example from another author’s book.

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The Writer’s Guide to Psychology is on a mission. Its title tells it all.

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Is the term “nervous breakdown” an accurate description of what can happen to someone under stress and who might be struggling with a major depression or panic attacks?

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We can carve journalism into two distinct cuts: the tough, chewy chuck of reporting and recording events and facts, and the sirloin of narrative.

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