Current/Public Affairs & Events

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Secondhand tells an important story about consumerism gone wild, the complex industry that has grown around its detritus, and how we can push back on an entrenched culture of disp

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Neal Katyal makes an unimpeachable case, concise but comprehensive, for impeachment.  The author of Impeach knows the law and how to practice it.

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Super Continent provides meaningful facts and ideas for assessing alternative futures in world affairs.

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“Part intriguing spy story, gripping war story, and compassionate love story, the book brings the reader right into the action . . .”

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Audience of One: Donald Trump, Television, and the Fracturing of America is a must read for those who want to understand the media phenomenon now in the White House.”

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“This work by Brown, Lipton, and Morisy reminds us that the powerful institutions of the federal government are only as good as the men and women who lead them.”

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The Vagina Bible is a reference that helps women and girls understand that the female body is complicated and fascinating and nothing to be ashamed of.

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“The radicals in Holly Jackson’s informative book speak not only with truth and passion but with a vision of a different, better America.” 

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“this is a good read for any empathetic, intellectually alive reader wondering about the world and the meaning of life.”

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The environment as an idea that explains human impact on our world sprang not from Rachel Carson’s iconic Silent Spring but from the unwanted awareness forced by World War II that we live

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“This book is highly recommended for anyone who wants to be more informed about issues related to our water supply, steps being taken to improve the situation, and ideas for the future.”

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“In pursuing Weinstein, the authors found that the casting couch system, long entrenched in Hollywood, still existed, though perhaps in a mutated form.

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“[An] insightful and penetrating study of the history of conservative nationalism in the United States.”

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“Anyone seeking to understand the deepest issues in world affairs should read this book, absorbing its positive contributions and debating whatever seems questionable.”            

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A Republic, If You Can Keep It opens delightfully with a short autobiography flavored with stories, among them, tracing family history, savoring chicken curry, eluding reporters and camera

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“Although its parts are fine, their sum does not quite add up to what we expect in a book by Gladwell.”

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“Machines will be capable, within twenty years, of doing any work a man can do.” This was the confident pronouncement of artificial intelligence pioneer Herb Simon in 1965.

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The Ungrateful Immigrant soars when Nayeri tells her own story. . . . It’s a moving exploration of the lasting impact of losing one’s country.”

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Here is a book that is terrifying-- things are getting worse than almost anybody dreamed—but is also a pleasure to read, because it is so interesting, so well written, and so infused with a warm hu

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Empire of Borders provides fundamental, essential information about the current human situation at the borders.”  

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“Block’s book demonstrates the urgent need for some progress . . .”

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Here is a wide-ranging history and analysis of a force—migration—that has shaped Europe and continues to do so today.

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“[T]he best part of White’s book [is] the stories of writers such as Pasternak, Solzhenitsyn, Sinyavsky, Havel, and others who courageously wrote and spoke the truth to power behind the iro

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“Jennifer Silva serves as much as an academic scholar as a personal therapist, and a reader has to ask how she could endure the endless suffering experienced by her all-too-honest subjects.

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“If you want a crash course in the evolution of postmodern capitalism over the last five decades read Kochland.”

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