Indvidual Artists

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“Classy and scholarly, punchy and approachable, Jean Dubuffet and the City demonstrates what future research and curating could offer to the next generation of art history publicat

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Published to coincide with the first major Berthe Morisot international exhibition in decades, if ever (this is, in fact, the first exhibition of its kind to be held in Canada), Berthe Morisot,

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Sargent: The Masterworks is a beautifully illustrated biographical narrative of the American Impressionist painter John Singer Sargent (1856–1925).

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Robotic Existentialism: The Art of Eric Joyner is a playful fantasy picture book that celebrates the “what if” of robots having free rein to live “human” lives.

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“No doubt, Georgia O’Keeffe would paint her support for the #MeToo movement though she might not post the tweets.”

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“Cézanne Portraits by John Elderfield is an exquisite book based on the exhibition . . .”

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“A bold and ambitious project, Jasper Johns: Pictures within Pictures, 1980–2015 serves as the most comprehensive collection to date of Johns’ mature work.”

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“this isn’t the usual tearjerker cancer story. It is a gleefully offensive cancer story. It is the Blazing Saddles of cancer stories.”

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“an insightful and ambitious book that is lavishly illustrated . . .”

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“as our fore-artists set the example, so shall we copy.”

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“Noma Bar is a master of the stylized silhouette and uses flat-color shapes to achieve highly sophisticated illustrative graphics.”

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“Lead Poisoning is a fantastic voyage into the head of an artistic visionary.”

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“a beautiful if hefty volume that will serve well as a fundamental study of de Kooning.”

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Of Dogs and Other People: The Art of Roy De Forest does a wonderful job of presenting both the person of Roy De Forest and the artwork he created.

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The past and the future are her playground, and she relays an open invitation to all who seek a daring museum experience.”

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“an extraordinary examination of parallel paths of two phenomenal artists, their work, and their seminal effect, which extends to the present day.”

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William Merritt Chase (1849–1916) is a pivotal figure in the history of American art. He was a contemporary of James Whistler and John Singer Sargent.

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“. . . a lesson about knowing what it takes to be an artist. A lesson about accepting and respecting our unique stories and points of view.”

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Modern Life is an expedition through a universe of insightful images that chronicle artist and illustrator Jean Jullien’s perceptions and observations of 21st century life.

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Vincent Van Gogh was one of those artists who brought the fullness of his unique character to his lifestyle, his relationships, and his artwork.

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From the 1960s through the early ‘90s, Italy was host to an artistic subgenre known as “sexy fumetti,” a wild blend of eroticism, horror, violence, and some extremely messed-up humor.

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“a treasure trove of insight on the artist . . .”

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Hubert Robert may be the most famous artist you’ve never heard of.  A-list fans like Louis XVI, Catherine the Great, and Voltaire clamored for his poetic views of architectural ruins.

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To most of us, Stuart Davis’ paintings are a joyful expression of color and frolicking graphic forms that seem to explode on the canvas in unscripted rhythms.

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