Fiction

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Jeffrey Archer is the international best-selling author of numerous novels, Kane and Abel perhaps being the best known of his prolific works.

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Blackwyrm Publications, May 2009 Twilight’s Jacob Black isn’t the only teenage werewolf with issues.

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Lauren Belfer has produced a grand, glorious, and occasionally disappointing tale of medicine, war, love, and other things in this 527-page historical novel.

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Julie Carr’s ability to convey the raw emotion of despair taps into a universal experience of suffering and loss.

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With her last few novels, Ayelet Waldman has skillfully mapped the emotional journeys of self-aware, sensitive, and deeply grieving characters.

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Hamster and Cheese, the first book in the Guinea PIG, Pet Shop Private Eye series, is a slim, 7x7-inch paperback that stands somewhere between a picture book and a standard graphic novel.

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“The greatest thing you’ll ever learn is to love and be loved in return.”

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Do you know a young child who freaks out when you turn on the vacuum? Does the noise make them run from the room in terror? Linda Bryan Sabin has the answer.

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The setting is Portland, Maine. The month is December, and the weather is bitter cold. The reviewer is reading this new mystery by James Hayman on a sweltering August day in California.

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The Duff is the debut novel of another young adult on the rise in the literary arena: eighteen-year-old Kody Keplinger.

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". . . examines the intersection of the development of personal identity with cultural identity and even political identity."

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With a single, broad stroke of her writer’s brush, dipped in a rich, multicolored palette, Paula Marantz Cohen captures Victorian London of the 1880s.

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Stein, Stoned, Hal Ackerman’s “first Harry Stein soft-boiled murder mystery,” is a delightful, lighthearted detective story that becomes more and more intriguing and exciting as it unfolds

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Reading Kenneth Wishnia’s new novel The Fifth Servant has been the most fun this reviewer’s had reading any book since Junot Diaz’s The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao two years

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This eminent English critic confronts those who would discard the modernist novel, whose heyday seems to have been from 1850 to 1950.

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We crave radiance in this austere world,
light in the spiritual darkness.
Learning is the one perfect religion,
its path correct, narrow, certain, straight.

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Outlaw is an apt title for this definitive collection of the works of Miguel Piñero.

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One could scarcely choose a better book to ward off a dreary winter's day than this latest installment to the 44 Scotland Street series.

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In X’ed Out, artist and writer Charles Burns returns to many of the themes and images that made his magnum opus, Black Hole, both a pleasure and a challenge to read.

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Lucky O’Toole has a job that some people would kill for: head of Customer Relations at the Babylon, the biggest, poshest casino/hotel in Las Vegas.

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Leader Garden Press, September 2009

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This fine author had a hit last year with his novel, Trust No One. The question is: Did he follow that effort with another that’s just as good or better?

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“. . . that was all hindsight, and hindsight wasn’t just twenty-twenty.  
Hindsight wrapped everything in sunshine.   It got in your eyes and

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 The summer before there were four girls: Kristy, Mary Anne, Claudia, and Stacey, each individuals with their own interests, families, and even at times their own problems.

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One of the stranger pairings in literary history is surely Somerset Maugham and Dorothy Parker, thrown together in rural South Carolina during the summer of 1942 for what Parker later grumbled had

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