Fiction.

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Catherine Coulter’s latest novel has almost everything an historical romance fan could want: A compelling hero and heroine, historical descriptions that make you feel like you traveled back in time

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On May 11 2010, the curtain well and truly rose on Stefanie Pintoff’s burgeoning crime fiction career, pulling her out of the shadows and into the limelight.

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In 2007 an intense debate heated up on the blogs of young adult authors Holly Black and Justine Larbalestier.

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Sometime in the early 1800s, somewhere in not-so-merry old England, doddering old Lord Upton lost his mind.

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Todd Johnson’s debut novel is not to be missed. This tale of five ordinary southern women will touch the reader’s heart. Set in a nursing home in rural Johnston County, N.

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The Postcard Killers by James Patterson and Liza Marklund is not a typical thriller. The riveting prologue sets the stage for promises the book is quick to deliver.

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Sometimes in life it takes the realization of the enormity of the problems of the less fortunate in the world to awaken individuals to issues that haunt them much closer to home.

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There’s a new sheriff in town, well, actually he’s a new hero created by a successful author of several action/mystery novels involving the FBI.

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 Some people are destined from birth to do great things.  Gil Orlov is born at the zenith of a full solar eclipse, the seventh daughter of a seventh daughter.  She is the end goal of a carefully pl

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Every once in a while, a book comes along that is so creatively out-of-the box that the reader isn’t quite sure what he holds in his hands.

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Samuel Zipp has written an intense and meticulously detailed textbook-style account of four projects that were built in post-World War II Manhattan.

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Margaret Hawkins is a Chicago writer and art critic. She has contributed to ARTnews and Chicago’s WBEZ public radio station. She also had a long-running column in the Chicago Sun-Times.

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If a sign of a well-crafted historical novel is when you rise up from the pages, startled by a sound, to discover it’s not the clatter of horses’ hooves that interrupted you—but rather the irritati

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July 1913 was the 50th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg. Fifty-four thousand white veterans from both sides of the battle met in what was called the Encampment.

 

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Full and proper character development appears to be becoming a lost art in fiction, but author Christina Baker Kline does her bit to revive the art in the intriguing novel Bird in Hand.

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A Murder on London Bridge is the fifth of Susanna Gregory’s Thomas Chaloner series. These stories portray post-Restoration England in all its confusion and contradiction.

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Danbert Nobacon, whose penname seems to be derived from an old knock-knock joke, is best known for his part in the rock band Chumbawamba.

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Already short-listed for the 2010 Man Booker Prize, Tom McCarthy’s new novel C is rightly deserving of the highest accolades, both on and off the literary podium.

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There are times when every teenager in the world feels like an alien. But Mackie Doyle doesn’t just feel like an outsider; he knows he is different: not normal, maybe not even human.

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In the current rush and abundance of vampire novels involving teenage protagonists and their dark and brooding love for the perfect immortal undead, it’s getting harder and harder to come up with s

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Dolly, the narrator of Dolly City, opens with a matter-of-fact, detailed description of cutting up a goldfish and eating it. Dolly states, “I took a plastic cup and fished out the corpse. . . .

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“Kill Creek is the perfect novel to read on Halloween.”

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Wilde in Love has everything readers of romance could wish, as well as a delightful twist of an ending.”

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In his newest novel, Crimes of the Father, Booker Prize-winner Thomas Keneally succeeds in the seemingly impossible task of burrowing deeply into the mindset of a pedophilic Catholic pries

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