African American

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One could compare the artistic career of Clarence Major to that of musical genius Miles Davis. Major has always been miles ahead of other African American writers.

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This thought-provoking novel is set in the years just after the Civil War.

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The 1920s is one of those decades everyone seems to look back at with fascination and nostalgia.

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quickly read but not easily forgotten. It’s a lovely story . . .”

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“warm and funny, touching in unpredictable chapters, and filled with McMillan’s signature snappy dialogue and salty inner monologue.”

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“Chasing the North Star is an epic journey, vividly detailed, acutely satisfying, and ultimately hopeful.”

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Kaitlyn Greenidge’s debut about family, race, and eugenics is a haunting coming-of-age novel.

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Set in the late 80s, Jed has escaped Chicago and the beginning of the AIDS crisis to return to where he experienced a hedonist paradise during his college days.

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This novel is as finely tuned as the best banjo played by 19-year-old runaway slave Henry Sims.

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It’s not every day you get a PI book sent to you for reviewing written by an actual authentic-to-the-bone private investigator, so I was really intrigued and looking forward to reading this debut n

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“perfect for young children just learning America’s history, long-time history buffs, and readers who love a stroll down memory lane . . .”

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"Balm is a powerful tale of individual loves, longings, and losses . . ."

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“. . . deserves to be read in its enchanting entirety before the inevitable movie deal comes to pass.”

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“Edward Kelsey Moore knows how to write a terrific, complex, believable, and always intriguing story.”

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“There’s no need to tell an abbreviation of Walter Mosley’s story here. If the reader wants a complicated and well-told mystery, it’s here.

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“. . . brilliant and gritty and urban . . . the most brutal coming of age story imaginable.”

The Kid is by far the most disturbing novel I have ever read.

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“Makeda is beyond ambitious and imaginative and, at times challenging, but it is also well written and powerful, with an ending that is equal parts tragic and romantic in nature.

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“If the reader has never had the pleasure of experiencing Jamaica or its people before reading The Goat Woman of Largo Bay, s/he will be captivated by a cast of characters as inter

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How to Read the Air finds Dinaw Mengestu building on many of the themes that made his debut novel, The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears, both a delight and a sorrow to read.

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