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    Despite flaws in his expectations of journalism, de Botton makes a number of astute observations about modern media.”

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    “The greatest thing you’ll ever learn is to love and be loved in return.”

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    “This is the work of a skilled storyteller—a writer in control of her craft.”

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    We can carve journalism into two distinct cuts: the tough, chewy chuck of reporting and recording events and facts, and the sirloin of narrative.

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    Although The New Rules of Marketing and PR is an update of the 2007 first edition book of the same name, it can also be considered as a sequel to Jay Conrad Levinson’s seminal Guerilla Ma

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    “Understanding the man behind Fox News, how his juggernaut was assembled, and how it is captained shines a new light on news reporting—whether one leans port or starboard.”

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    Mention the news company, Al Jazeera, and it’s likely the response will not be without a strong opinion of the Qatar-based news network.

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    “. . . thorough, thoughtful, and exceptionally well written. . . . Page One is a most encompassing volume on the issue of the future of journalism and newspapers. . . .

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    “It's becoming increasingly difficult for anyone to see the world as it truly is.”

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    “Unlike most of the news stories we read these days, The Paris Correspondent provides a satisfying ending, with truth served and the honor of the journalism profession upheld—even

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    “Every Jew has a name.” So begins this historic work by Italian reporter Giulio Meotti.

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    “It’s comforting to know that the people we rely on care about us and their work with all their hearts.

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    Norman Doidge’s book, The Brain That Changes Itself, helps to usher in a new branch of brain science called neuroplasticity.

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    It would be easy to write an Obama-backlash book using buzzwords and cliché ridden accounts of the right-wing talk show blather-babblers.

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    FIRST-TIME AUTHOR WRITES INSIDER’S VIEW OF NEWSPAPER BUSINESS would be the headline for The Imperfectionists, which begins each chapter with a different heading (some humorous and others m

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    “Understanding Autism offers an extremely useful overview of many of the issues currently being explored today in connection with autism. . . .

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