Sally D. Ketchum

Sally D. Ketchum is a teacher with national honors who also writes award-winning fiction and poetry for both children and adults. Her book, Bread Garden, a multicultural novel, was nominated to the Michigan notable book list. Ms. Ketchum’s picture book, Moon Wants, was a prize winner at the San Francisco Writer’s conference.

Books by Sally D. Ketchum

Book Reviews by Sally D. Ketchum

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Spencer Quinn’s new book is Woof, and Woof is a delightful contribution to children’s literature. Quinn has written a book that is bound to become a classic.

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Such a long and detailed story, The Sweetheart Rules, chock full of lovers and their animals, is also full of romance in 304 pages, including the epilogue of Swee

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“. . . hard to put down . . .”

The astonishing success of Phillip Margulies’ first novel is not accidental.

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“Ms. Jump is an exceptional, humorous romantic writer.”

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Kate Christensen’s autobiography Blue Plate Special is remarkable for three reasons. First: The appetites mentioned in the subtitle are yearnings for good food and fulfilling sex.

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“Readers will find accompanying Ms. Altman on her journey from childhood to a life of love and a life filled with love makes for a lively trip.”

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“. . . funny to readers who like raunchy blue humor . . .”

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“A Dog Named Boo is a truly perfect book.”

A Dog Named Boo by Lisa J. Edwards will please dog lovers, but it is much more than a good dog tale.

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“Liar and Spy is a worthwhile read . . .”

Rebecca Stead covers a lot of ground in her new middle grade mystery Liar and Spy.

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“What’s a poor reader to do but laugh?”

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“Mr. Vande Zande understands attempts for grace under pressure as well as the dignity inherent in failure.”

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“Charlie Newton’s second thriller is as brilliant as his much awarded Calumet City.

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“Mr. Harrison writes of the higher truths that he not only sees, but also lives. He might be a called the Philosopher King of earth—and so might his protagonist, Sunderson. . . .

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“The careful reader, the one who assumes nothing as s/he reads, will be the most satisfied. Assumption is a well-written mystery with an unexpected, rare, and unique ending.”

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“One Writer’s Garden is a handsome, durable book. If a reader has interest in gardens and also American literature, it will prove nearly irresistible.

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“Molly Birnbaum’s memoir might be the best food-related book of 2011. . . .

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“Joni Cole’s voice may be brutal, but readers, drawn to turn to the next page, will be rewarded: She is funny—and so is her gutsy book.”

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“It’s all there for the reader to expect the unexpected. Timing, so important in comedy, is also exacting in the Mr. Norman’s expert hands. . . .

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“Only seven of her nearly 1,800 poems were published while she was alive, but most of Dickinson’s verses were published by [Thomas Wentworth] Higginson after her death.

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“Anatomy of Influence: Literature as a Way of Life is critical addition to the classic canon of Western literary criticism. Like Dr.

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“Like many authors who prefer imagination to reality, Ms. Davies blends folklore, fairy tales, fantasy, and even oral tradition—and does so brilliantly . . .”

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“Yawp,” “mudluscious,” “lullly, lullay!” Modern poets broke all rules as they infused their work with everything new: invented words, imagism, concrete poetry, free verse, irony, oxymora held toget

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A headless corpse appears on Lacey’s lawn. And that is how what author Lisa Lutz calls her first “proper crime novel” begins.

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Is Scottish writer Kate Atkinson brilliant or quirky or both?

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Successfully mixing two genres—comedy and crime—is a daunting task, but talented writers, like Tim Dorsey, manage to accomplish what readers seek in the mixture of the two.

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“FACT: The Police Service has for many years used criminals as covert human intelligence sources. A cooperation that is denied and concealed.

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The structure of Born Under a Lucky Moon is determined by Jeannie Thompson, the heroine, who goes back and forth relating the events of her life during two years, 1986 and 2006, and gives

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Cliff, a former Michigan English teacher turned farmer finds himself in a midlife crisis when his wife suddenly leaves home for another man.