Saadia Faruqi

Saadia Faruqi is a Pakistani American writer of fiction and nonfiction. She writes for a number of publications including Huffington Post about the global contemporary Muslim experience and about interfaith dialogue.

She is editor in chief of Blue Minaret, a magazine for Muslim art, poetry, and prose. Her short stories have been published in several American literary journals and magazines such as Catch & Release, On the Rusk, In Flight, and The Great American Literary Magazine.

Brick Walls: Tales of Hope and Courage from Pakistan is her debut fiction title. She is currently working on a novel based on immigrant experiences.

 

Books by Saadia Faruqi

Book Reviews by Saadia Faruqi

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Many writers have written about the immigrant experience, but most focus on the tension between generations: how the older generations of immigrants—those fresh off the boat, so to speak—want to re

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The desperate lives of Christians in many Muslim majority countries is no secret.

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First and foremost this is a book about food, which makes it a natural for chef turned writer Donia Bijan.

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offers real solutions to the problems immigration poses and gives us facts to combat false narratives and hateful political discourse.”

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College campuses are in the news for various reasons these days, student rights and racism on the top of that list.

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Few are aware of the trials faced by foreign nationals who live in the United Arab Emirates, also known as the Gulf States. News reports from the region focus more on the locals and their kings.

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". . . rare but brilliant short story collection . . ."

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“This is a must-read book for everyone who is debating the refugee crisis . . .”

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Nonfiction wrapped up in fiction, academic arguments presented as stories. Sekaran has admirably shown us all sides without bias.”

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What happens to people who go through extreme trauma? What happens to their future generations as they grapple with parents and grandparents with indelible stains on their psyche?

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As the American nation watches the often ugly coverage of the elections of 2016 on their television screens, as we hear of #BlackLivesMatter on a daily basis, a book about race relations seems to b

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It’s a fact that everyone knows: America is a country of immigrants. The Irish, the Germans, the Arabs, even the founding fathers and the first colonists, were all immigrants.

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In recent times of rising Islamophobia, rampant misinformation about Islam, and political rhetoric against Muslims, books showcasing the positive aspects of Muslims in America are very welcome.

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What happens when disaster strikes? We’ve read books about the people involved in natural or manmade disasters and watched movies about them.

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Nadia Hashimi’s new novel about life in Afghanistan is another gem, although readers will find little to celebrate in such a dark reflection of Afghani culture.

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Teenaged girls have enough problems in high school. Classes, college, boys . . . it’s almost a boring old formula.

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At first glance, The Angels Die is a straightforward story about a young man afflicted by crippling poverty who finds meaning in his wretched life through boxing.

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Being a first-generation American college student is hard enough, but when you throw an international immigration battle right in the middle of your neighborhood, life can get absolutely chaotic.