Robert Nersesian

Robert Nersesian is president of Public Advocacy Associates, LLC, a communications consulting firm.

Mr. Nersesian has more than 30 years’ experience as a communications consultant and executive. He has worked across a number of industry sectors—telecommunications, financial services, retailing, nonprofit, and manufacturing—involving such communications specialties as public affairs, speechwriting, media relations, community relations, employee communications, and philanthropy.

For 25 years at AT&T, Mr. Nersesian led grassroots campaigns, headed media relations teams, wrote speeches, and represented AT&T in the community.

As a consultant, he has also worked on projects for Walmart Stores, IBM, Merrill Lynch, the San Francisco Foundation, The New Jersey Policy Research Institute, The New Jersey State Chamber of Commerce, and The Arthritis Foundation.

Mr. Nersesian earned a bachelor’s degree in history from the University of Virginia, and holds master’s degrees from Yale University and New York University’s Stern School of Business in fine arts and business, respectively. He has taught corporate communications at Fairleigh Dickinson University in Madison, N.J.

Mr. Nersesian’s op-eds have been published in the New York Times, the Washington Post, and Newsday. His short stories have appeared in Ararat magazine. He has two published plays for children, and a short story included in the anthology, Crossroads.

Book Reviews by Robert Nersesian

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“. . . despite Ms. Freeland’s tut-tutting about the new power elite, her unintended message is that money, status, and power have always been the gods we pursue.”

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“. . . with a title paying tribute to vampires, this is a book you can sink your teeth into. . . . Floss will be useless for clearing out the debris.”

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Occupy Wall Street was soooo cool. I commuted from my aunt’s house in Manhasset to Zuccotti Park every day. We stuck it to the man. We told it.

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“The author of such works as Liar’s Poker and Moneyball, Mr.

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Let’s for a moment get our bearings after the summer of 2011’s little economic unpleasantness.

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“The financial crisis of 2008 was a beauty pageant of fraud, failure, and forgiveness.

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In the Information Age, the sacred bonds of tech hookups trump the holy vows of matrimony.

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There was some hubbub recently about an IBM supercomputer beating two “Jeopardy!” champions.

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The pillars of commerce—trade and finance—now seem like lost relics in an archaeological dig.

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A marked shift has occurred in the tone and assumptions surrounding our national fortune.

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Imagine, if you will, that our government wants more business growth in, say, lower Manhattan. It issues a charter to a worthy company—how about Goldman Sachs, for the sake of argument?

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As we end the year, serious business readers (which outnumber frivolous scanners two to one, according to my statistics) have crumpled face first into a long winter’s nap.

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From its overheated title to its Big Journalism authors, it would be easy to dismiss All the Devils Are Here: The Hidden History of the Financial Crisis as the latest financial-crisis widg

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Would the ideas Tim Wu espouses in The Master Switch: The Rise and Fall of Information Empires have been published if we weren’t still picking through the wreckage caused by the financial

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We can carve journalism into two distinct cuts: the tough, chewy chuck of reporting and recording events and facts, and the sirloin of narrative.

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All across America, business owners sleep the sleep of the troubled, nay, the guilty. They awake screaming, afflicted with a common nightmare.

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Face it, denizens of the business world, our teamwork is and always has been an unmitigated disaster.

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Steven Rattner is known in New York circles as an operator.

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With multinational corporations firmly ensconced as the evil raptors of our economy, small businesses have now become the red, white, and blue of a new commercial patriotism.

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How the heck did Hewlett-Packard become the Peyton Place of Silicon Valley?

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It was Tom Peters who started the business book boom.

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In 1984, one of the more unlikely lecture duos toured the country from one college auditorium to the next.

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The words “Armenia” and “bittersweet” have been a natural pairing for the people of that country and its diaspora.

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This year’s Slap-In-The-Face-Get-A-Grip-Bub Award for business books goes to Jeffrey Pfeffer, business professor at Stanford and author of nine volumes on organization dynamics.

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If there’s one thing that doesn’t quite compute, it’s reading about the nation’s dysfunctional economy while one of the greatest business resources of our time–the Internet–is changing the nature o

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Consider these words, penned by a man who helped shape one of the most prosperous eras in American business history:

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In 1990 Wall Street Journal reporters Bryan Burrough and John Helyar wrote Barbarians at the Gate, the account of the leveraged buyout of RJR Nabisco.

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Cockroaches will endure after the final mushroom cloud disappears; similarly, the financial industrial complex—the economists, traders, bankers, regulators, and journalists—will continue to try to

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After an economic meltdown, a decade of war in the Middle East, and an Old Testament geyser in the gulf, we face a fork in the road of our national journey: Are our institutions—be they government,

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Memo to: Messrs. O’Reilly & Tennant

From: Your Book Reviewer

I read your book.

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Thank goodness not everyone can make a living off of their childhood ambitions. Otherwise, who would serve as insurance actuaries?

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For all the dyspepsia induced by the Great Recession, Niall Ferguson, one of our best economic historians, has offered us a tonic: a biography not of a dealer, trader, or hedger, but rather a b

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The cliché is that we live in an age of celebrity—where even our current president is revered more for the role each of us projects on him (Avatar of racial progress? Pioneer of multiculturalism?

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Woe be unto the American marketplace. Its raw commodities are exhausted, its markets sullied; it is a land of bad deals, betrayed customers, and unscrupulous operators. . . .

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Despite our economic malaise, one industry has emerged and continues to thrive: the publication of books about our economic malaise.