Nicole Langan

Nicole Langan is the owner of Tribute Books, an independent publisher for independent writers. She is proud to provide graphic design, quality printing, national distribution and book promotion for writers with an entrepreneurial spirit. She applauds risk takers and strives to provide them with an outlet for their creations.
After graduating from Marywood University and spending time as an associate editor for a local magazine, Ms. Langan set up a publishing company in, of all places, Archbald, Pennsylvania, where she was born and raised.

Ms. Langan loves the behind-the-scenes process of editing a book, creating a book cover, formulating an attractive layout, and sending press releases to the media to announce a book launch—that’s what gives her a thrill. She also loves to see people realize their dream of being published, a dream they might have considered impossible—because even in these crazy times, isn’t that what America’s all about?

Book Reviews by Nicole Langan

Reviewed by: 

“a masterwork by a skilled craftsman . . . make a vow to read this book.”

Who knew that King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella shared such a passionate romance?

Reviewed by: 

Joe DiMaggio as an autistic ballplayer is an interesting concept. Jerome Charyn explores this theory in Joe DiMaggio: The Long Vigil.

Reviewed by: 

Ah, angst. When women are stressed out and dealing with emotional, life changing events, they tend to worry themselves to no end.

Reviewed by: 

The loss of a beloved animal is often best commiserated among fellow pet owners.

Reviewed by: 

Young women of the Victorian era were expected to be pristine, unblemished, and pure. But how did they really behave? Were calculated means employed to achieve desired marital ends?

Reviewed by: 

Some girls have all the luck.

Reviewed by: 

Do men really find women who knit sexy?

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Sometimes the scope of human tragedy is too large to comprehend. The mind grasps for alternate explanations in order to come to terms with staggering loss.

Reviewed by: 

Some pieces of literature are art in its highest form. Sea Change by Jeremy Page is one of those books.He paints with words instead of merely constructing a narrative.

Reviewed by: 

Why would a 10-year-old boy wish to die in battle? Could a life that has not yet truly begun be so easily forsaken?

Reviewed by: 

Not since the glory days of Buffy the Vampire Slayer has a female killer of the undead burst onto the scene with such aplomb.

Reviewed by: 

One of the great mysteries of faith is how God does not play favorites with his love. It is not parceled out based on the severity of one’s personal struggles.

Reviewed by: 

Promise Me, by Christmas mega-author, Richard Paul Evans (The Christmas Box, The Christmas List) is one of those sentimental stories that a reader either devours or detests.

Reviewed by: 

How would a five-year-old boy experience the birth of Jesus?

Reviewed by: 

Royalty is common fare for historical fiction, but the lives of the saints are usually not.

Reviewed by: 

Mr. Darcy as a Wild West cowboy? A dungaree-clad Elizabeth Bennett flying over the range on her painted pony?

Reviewed by: 

The Winter Sea is one of those novels that a reader doesn’t come across too often. It is a creative tour de force.

Reviewed by: 

In Regency England, would an earl really marry his housekeeper? That is the question posed by Grace Burrowes in her debut historical romance, The Heir.

Reviewed by: 

Nuns in outer space? Churches in virtual reality? Priests as robots? Sometimes the most unlikely pairings lead to the most interesting literary achievements.

Reviewed by: 

First impressions can be deceiving. The first chapter of Murray Tillman’s Meet Me on the Paisley Roof is the ultimate turn-off.

Reviewed by: 

“The life of man, solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short.”
—Thomas Hobbes, English political philosopher (1588-–1679), The Leviathan

Reviewed by: 

There exists a fascination with Emily Dickinson, a genius in a tiny bedroom scribbling poems that would become legendary. A mythological recluse writing about life, but not participating in it.

Reviewed by: 

A lobster isn’t the most likely character for a children’s book. Yet Dave Wilkinson creates a modern-day fable based on the life cycle of the crustacean in The Aspirant.

Reviewed by: 

The Boss meets Bronte in April Lindner’s remake of the classic Victorian novel, Jane Eyre.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Teaching a child to have compassion is important. Jane Bregoli’s The Goat Lady is a true story that shows how love can bring an elderly outcast back into the folds of society.

Reviewed by: 

Sometimes a character is left in the dark throughout an entire novel. In Tina Martin’s Secrets on Lake Drive, Monica Smith is clueless.

Reviewed by: 

Royal families hold the title of being the precursor of reality entertainment. These infamous courts provide more melodrama and intrigue than chivalry and decorum.

Reviewed by: 

For anyone who has walked side-by-side in the culminating steps of the life of an elderly person, Ann Putnam’s Full Moon at Noontide is a healing balm. She understands.

Reviewed by: 

How to Master Your Muck by Kathi Burns hits everything on the checklist for a well-designed book. A “how-to” title? Check.

Reviewed by: 

Do you know a young child who freaks out when you turn on the vacuum? Does the noise make them run from the room in terror? Linda Bryan Sabin has the answer.

Reviewed by: 

Nothing stirs a female heart more than a handsome man with a physical challenge. The inherent mothering instinct is intertwined with a mixture of physical desire and deep-seated admiration.

Reviewed by: 

Pets make an indelible impression on the lives of their owners. Their antics and quirks become part of family lore.

Reviewed by: 

Believability is key in historical fiction, especially when your main character is a female assassin.

Reviewed by: 

(Blackwyrm Publications, July 2009)

Reviewed by: 

When author B. Lynn Goodwin became the primary caregiver of her elderly mother, she turned to writing as a form of therapy. In her book, You Want Me To Do What?

Reviewed by: 

Leader Garden Press, September 2009

Reviewed by: 

What is G. F. Skipworth’s The Simpering, North Dakota Literary Society?

Reviewed by: 

Blackwyrm Publications, February 2009

Reviewed by: 

A manic desire. A refusal to let things go. An unwavering belief in one’s importance. Meet Philippa Gregory’s The Red Queen.

Reviewed by: 

Ancient Wisdom Publications, September 2009

Reviewed by: 

Reading the work of a truly talented author is a well-savored delight for a book lover. When it comes to the art of writing, C. W. Gortner’s name can be added to the list of master craftsmen.

Reviewed by: 

Hamlet’s Gertrude. The Taming of the Shrew’s Katherina.

Reviewed by: 

Imagine a pristine world out of the realm of Avatar peopled by creatures from Where The Wild Things Are and you have a glimpse into the mental imagery of Ray Shoop in his sci-fi work,

Reviewed by: 

Romance with a social message rooted in Christianity is the basis of Kathi Macias’ Extreme Devotion Series.

Reviewed by: 

Marilyn Meredith captures the essence of an untimely death in her paranormal romance, Lingering Spirit. Police officer Steve Ainsworth is gunned down during a routine traffic stop.

Reviewed by: 

Emphasis shifts from Paige (our detective protagonist in the first novel) to Junna (her long-lost sister) and from mind reading to demonic possession in Left in the Dark, the second instal

Reviewed by: 

The guys from T.A.P.S. are delving into the scariest territory of all: adolescence.

Reviewed by: 

First time novelist L. M. Preston succeeds in writing a book boys will want to read. Not an easy task when 12-year-olds are more captivated by a flashing screen than a stationary page.

Reviewed by: 

Many turn to God in times of trouble. Chicken Soup for the Soul: Devotional Stories for Women hits its stride when it tackles more serious subject matter. Editors Susan M.

Reviewed by: 

Story vignettes are like hors d’oeuvres. They pique your interest, but they’re not very filling.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Beyond Those Distant Stars is science fiction that plays well to a female audience. The heroine, Stella McMasters, is a cyborg.

Reviewed by: 

It takes supreme confidence in one’s ability to put on the cover: “The book everyone is talking about.” Not to mention Dirk Vandereyken is shown sticking out his tongue in his author photo.

Reviewed by: 

Blackwyrm Publications, May 2009

Reviewed by: 

Dog stories are meant to tug at the heartstrings. But A Man and His Maniac: The Bunkie Story does so in a down-to-earth way.

Reviewed by: 

When perusing a thriller, readers are expected to suspend their disbelief. Circumstances that are improbable in reality are readily accepted in a fictitious world where anything is possible.

Reviewed by: 

The History Press, November 2009