Martin A. David

Martin A. David calls himself an “Arts Practitioner.” He came up with that title to simplify explanations of what he does. He is a writer who has published six books (The Dancer’s Audition Book, An Actor Analyzes a Script, Karpstein Was Hiding, Shtetl In My Mind, and Death in 5, Let the World Lend a Hand), over 1,200 magazine, newspaper, and online articles, and seven book-length translations (Danish to English, but he also translates French, Spanish, and Norwegian to English).

Mr. David is a working actor and director whose first professional role was in Joe Papp’s Shakespeare company in New York; more recently he played a mob boss in a music video. He is a modern dancer and choreographer who has directed modern dance companies in Europe and the U.S. He also writes plays and several, including Leaden Skies, a holocaust-themed work, and The Rehearsal, have been seen as part of the San Francisco Theater Festival.

Mr. David lives in Denver, Colorado, where he writes, acts, draws, and makes jewelry.

Book Reviews by Martin A. David

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“an important entry into the literature of American dance history. It deserves recognition as a classic.”

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Florenz Ziegfeld Jr was one of the many complex individuals who shaped American theater.

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“Carey Perloff’s leadership of American Conservatory Theater is one of the reasons San Francisco remains a respected center of the art form in our country.”

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“The author keeps it personal . . . and she keeps it real.”

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“Unfortunately, Life’s Operating Manual is not the book to dispense to the caretakers of all the new arrivals at your local maternity ward.”

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Scholarly research can be a wonderful thing. It can connect the dots between seemingly diverse topics and reveal relationships that are not obvious to the casual observer.

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“Janyce Stefan-Cole may not have had a tight hold on the reins in this novel, but there are numerous implied promises that there are stronger works waiting to roll off her keyboard.”

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“There are no vagaries in The Actor as Storyteller. Everything, right down to the section on ‘Knowing the right people’ is realistic, specific, and precise. Mr.

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“Nothing about Bringing the Body to the Stage and Screen is hasty or superficial. Author Lust offers the essences of the work in every page.

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“Ms. Meynendonckx’s book gives an international view of movie crime and its bloody, reality-based equivalent. Much of the focus is on crime in America and the Hollywood version of same. .

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“The nine short works are not all theater masterworks, but they are a fair representation of the spectrum of styles and subjects being examined by contemporary playwrights.”

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“Fundamentals of Theatrical Design hardly ever loses steam. . . .

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“. . . an acting book that is both valuable and informative. . . . a plethora of insights.”

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“Ms. Osborne’s research into the life—and unfortunately, the death—of the Federal Theatre Project (FTP) goes well beyond the project itself.

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“Setting up and arguing with a straw man is a good philosophical technique. The problem here is that the straw man appears to have won the argument.”

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One often approaches a sequel or second edition with a certain amount of trepidation.

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Alan Arkin can be called an actor’s actor. He is immersed in the craft of acting, and he has been since childhood.

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Author Lipstadt’s name entered the headlines when she was sued for libel by the Holocaust denying pseudo-historian David Irving.

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Richard Schickel’s Conversations with Scorsese is accurately named. It is a 448-page notebook filled with transcribed conversations.

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Autobiographies by non-writers have a special flavor. Sometimes they taste like entrées prepared by non-cooks—just a little off target.

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After a smash hit success with Seabiscuit, her book about a horse, Laura Hillenbrand has taken on another runner as the focal point of her new book.

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(Palgrave Macmillan, April 13, 2010)

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Author John Caird is an impressively credentialed theater man.

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In many circles it is highly recommended—and in most universities, required—that student actors read the volumes of scripture-like pronouncements by Stanislavsky, Brecht, Vakhtangov, Grotowski, and

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Full disclosure demands that I start by revealing that I am also a translator of Scandinavian languages. That’s what led me to pick up this book.

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Steve Heller is an astute cultural observer and historian. He sees and hears the icons of culture and uses a flowing narrative style to pin them down for the rest of us to examine.

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Monologues are important items in an actor’s tool kit. Most audition situations require an actor to deliver a monologue as part of the casting process.

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Cecil B. DeMille was one of the first true giants of the American film industry. His bigger than life persona has inspired author Eyman to attempt a bigger than life portrait.

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Wendy Richmond has put together a swirling assortment of ideas, observations, tips, philosophy, quotes, and anecdotes about art.

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It’s easy to imagine author Dixon sitting in libraries and film archives taking copious notes.