Marilyn Gates

Marilyn Gates PhD is Professor Emerita of Anthropology at Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, Canada. Educated at Haberdashers’ Aske’s School for Girls and Sheffield University in England, she received her doctorate in Geography from the University of British Columbia.

Her research has focused on the transformation of the Latin American peasantry and the environment under globalization. Her teaching centers on these fields, along with the anthropology of modern life, sustainability, and contemporary urban communities and cultures.

Author of In Default: Peasants, the Debt Crisis and the Agricultural Challenge in Mexico (Westview Press), she has published in a variety of scholarly journals in the social sciences, and also enjoys writing for the internet community.

Dr. Gates loves mentoring students, debate, travel, languages, and reviewing books!

Book Reviews by Marilyn Gates

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“Cuba: This Moment, Exactly So is a feast for the eyes and all the senses, celebrating the human spirit exulting in the sheer joy of living . . .”

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The blind spot is the point of entry of the optic nerve to the retina that lacks sensitivity to light. It is an area where a person’s view is obstructed, where visual information is missing.

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As Donald Trump might claim, we are the largest audience to witness what is possibly the biggest ever corporate coup, the takeover of a country.

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Atlanta is an alpha city, playing a significant role on the world stage as a major transportation hub and influential financial and economic center with key national and global functions.

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Every generation spawns a handful of academics who become public intellectual rock stars resonating across a broad swath of social concerns far beyond their specific specializations.

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“a wake up call about the dangers of entrenching divisions around national identity—a summons to action.”

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Why are we so fascinated by photographs of pristine places? Escapism via armchair travel? Hunger to return to simpler times and less-trodden lands where nature still holds sway?

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The majority of humankind has long since stopped depending on hunting for subsistence, but we are still strangely fascinated by wild animals, the larger the better.

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The Death and Life of the Single Family House is an important contribution to urban studies . . .”

 

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National Geographic magazine has been a window on the world for some five generations of Americans.

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A cornerstone of America’s foundational narrative is that we are a nation of highly diverse immigrants simmering together in a mythical melting pot to cook up our trademark independent, industrious

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“We depend upon the benefits from nature to sustain our bodies and the solace of wild places to soothe our souls, but somewhere along the way we lost respect for nature. We lost wonder.

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“They paved paradise and they put up a parking lot.”
—Joni Mitchell, 1970

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“For some families, sending a child to a private university now is like buying a BMW every year—and driving it off a cliff.

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Most of us have experienced the urge to make our mark on the world—literally and visibly.

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Popular culture’s visual imaginaries of traditional Native Americans tend to exotic representations of a vanished people.

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Almanac is an inviting, almost cozy word. For example, The Old Farmer’s Almanac evokes a folksy image of sitting by the fireside planning spring planting.

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Plato asserted that “What is honored in a country will be cultivated there.” If so,  it could be argued that the U.S.A. today honors computers, social media, and the iPhone.

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“making the personal political and the political truly personal.”

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“Family Secrets resonates with authenticity, and makes us look deep within ourselves and our sanitized domestic histories . . .”

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“comprehensive, compelling and thought-provoking . . .”

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“underscores the imperative of immigration reform for both practical and humanitarian reasons.”

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“The case Dr. Zayas makes for immigration reform is compelling . . .”

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Dreamland stands as a model of meticulous investigative reporting . . .”

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“a clarion call for citizen action, offering a cornucopia of examples . . .”

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“Until we abandon needs-based approaches where food insecurity is regarded as an individual problem and ‘handouts’ are given to deserving ‘beneficiaries’ instead of to rights-holding reside

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“multiple voices use the power of story to tell their Class Lives as both noun and verb.”

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“It is not that migrants never come back, it is that they can never come home enough to keep families, cultures, and hearts whole.

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“Dr. Piper has written an eye-opening book about a hotly contested vital resource. . . . No hiding in libraries for this academic. . . .

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“In sum, Radical Cities offers a rich buffet of inspiring sketches of imaginative approaches to improving quality of life in more livable settlements.

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“The central question guiding these conversations is how do we balance border control and America’s need for a vital workforce through humane and viable alternatives to xenophobia and a for

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Life Interrupted provides eye-opening insights into the lives of almost invisible migrants forced to labor under inhuman conditions in o

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Whatever the reader may think about American immigration policy and N.’s rather unusual personal situation for a Mexican immigrant, we have to appreciate his determination

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“Involvement in the drug trade is seen often as a realistic or necessary alternative for marginalized Mexicans—even if they end up as casualties.”

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“. . . eloquent, gritty, and incisive . . .”

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“. . . should be required reading for anyone seeking insider insight . . .”