Lisa Verge Higgins

Lisa Verge Higgins is the bestselling author of sixteen novels that have been published worldwide and translated into as many languages;quite a switch for this former PhD candidate in chemistry. Currently writing women's fiction for Hachette, Lisa's books have finaled for a RITA, won the Golden Leaf Award, and twice she has cracked Barnes & Noble's General Fiction Forums top twenty books of the year. She currently lives in New Jersey with her husband and their three teenage daughters, who never fail to make life interesting.

Book Reviews by Lisa Verge Higgins

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“Ms. Emling’s riveting new biography reveals in page-turning prose the life-balance struggles of a true genius.”

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“Ms. Thompson focuses her keen eye, sharp pen, and exasperated sense of humor on the familiar, everyday madness of raising teenagers. . . . Ms.

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“Anne Enright’s razor-sharp writing turns every ordinary detail into a weapon, to create a story that cuts right to the bone.”

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“Definitely Not Mr. Darcy is entertainment in its purest form, a skirt-flying tumble of a story, and an excellent, lighthearted way to while away a quiet afternoon.”

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“Ah, Paris. . . . drawn here with deftness and delicacy, from the open-air markets to the multiple bars and cafes—appears to cast a spell . . . Dramatic fiction is all about bad decisions.

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Caleb Cheeshahteaumuck, the protagonist of this elegiac novel about the early days of the Plymouth Colony, was an actual historical figure, a Native American nephew of a powerful Wôpanâak medicine

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“Against all odds, against my own wishes, this is a love story.”

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“There are eras of every life that have a carapace about them, a scar grown out of the woundedness . . .

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Over 200 years ago, the residents of Paris spent 12 hard-earned sous to walk through a little wax museum on the Boulevard du Temple, in order to be titillated by the well-molded figure of the court

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Were it possible to review Imogen Robertson’s debut historical mystery, Instruments of Darkness, through two separate lenses—first as a straight historical novel, and, secondly, as a strai

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“Most. Embarrassing. Moment.

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Oh, to be a 19th century English aristocrat compelled to take a languorous journey by coach—ship—camel to the mysteries of Egypt, where upon a sturdy square-sailed dahabieh, doting servants attend

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Motherlode, the fictional dusty California gold-rush town whose evolution Mary Volmer portrays so charmingly in her debut novel, is a character of its own—a gawky preteen of a sort, a formerly happ

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With her last few novels, Ayelet Waldman has skillfully mapped the emotional journeys of self-aware, sensitive, and deeply grieving characters.

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It’s impossible to avoid comparisons between The Astronomer, Lawrence Goldstone’s deft historical thriller, and that familiar blockbuster, The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown.

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Every once in a while, a book comes along that is so creatively out-of-the box that the reader isn’t quite sure what he holds in his hands.

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If a sign of a well-crafted historical novel is when you rise up from the pages, startled by a sound, to discover it’s not the clatter of horses’ hooves that interrupted you—but rather the irritati

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A doff of the hat to the powers-that-be at Dutton for having the courage in this economy, and the faith in Mr.