Jeremy McGuire

Jeremy McGuire is a playwright, author and illustrator. He attended Bradley University for three years before spending two years in the U.S. Army where he achieved some success as an actor at the Fort Bragg Playhouse. After his service, Mr. McGuire graduated with a B.A. in Theatre from Illinois State University and went on to get his Master of Fine Arts in Play Directing. His most recent book is O’Shaughnessey: The Faerie Circle. Mr. McGuire has been a television journalist and reviewer and writes a weekly article for his blog, Baloney & Blarney, which may be found at his website.

Books by Jeremy McGuire

Book Reviews by Jeremy McGuire

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Coelho has written with great passion and empathy about how our lives may be perfect examples of doing everything necessary to get the opposite of what we want.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“As a popular historical work, Dying Every Day is highly recommended for anyone wishing to know how power is acquired, used, abused and to what ends.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

If Somerset is a bit formulaic, it is still a novel those who loved Meacham’s other books will relish.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“In Goddesses Campbell attempts to restore the feminine to its rightful place in world mythology.”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . informative and entertaining, filled with grisly anecdotes and case histories, religious, social, and medical interpretations . . .”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . [a] miracle of a novel.”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . a great work of art . . .”

Reviewed by: 

Greenbeard is science fiction with a sense of humor.”

Reviewed by: 

“It is a monumental task, this getting into the mind of a man as complex and extraordinary as Tesla. Anthony Flacco is up to the task.”

Nikola Tesla had to be stopped.

Reviewed by: 

“If you want to know what a population’s values are, take a look at how it handles the issues of crime and punishment.”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . engaging and informative book . . . compellingly creates the world the two antagonists inhabited, replete with a cast of interesting and colorful supporting characters.”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . a gripping, adventuresome novel with profound insight into the ways in which we choose our destiny . . .”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . fiendishly funny. . . . Dante himself would probably applaud.”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . a work that is rich in the details of the artist’s outer and inner life . . .”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . an entertaining read, . . . The Immortalists is a truly great mystery novel by one of the best authors working in the genre today.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“The Marriage Artist is one of those rare novels that meet all the criteria for greatness: It entertains, informs, enlightens and finally and most importantly, it inspires.

Reviewed by: 

“Its familiarity and comfort level are its greatest strengths. . . . [but] we can’t help wanting more.”

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“[a] well-crafted, beautifully written, and engaging mystery. . . . Carson Morton is, quite frankly, a masterful storyteller.”

Reviewed by: 

“Ultimately, it doesn’t matter whether the title is justified or not.

Reviewed by: 

J. M. Tohline’s first novel, The Great Lenore, is a beautiful book. It is beautiful in the same way that J. D. Salinger’s books are beautiful.

Reviewed by: 

In the enlightening and readable A Thousand Times More Fair, author Kenji Yoshino opens a window on Shakespearean dramaturgy and scholarship and lets in a breath of fresh air.

Reviewed by: 

R. J. Anderson’s marvelous novel for teens, Wayfarer, is everything you would want a faerie story to be. She has written a winning fantasy adventure that doesn’t seem like a fantasy.

Reviewed by: 

TimeRiders, Alex Scarrow’s science fiction novel for young adults, proves him a worthy twenty-first century successor to H. G. Wells

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

Five Days Apart succeeds for many reasons, not the least of which is the author’s spot-on evocation of a specific time and place: Dublin, Ireland, in the nineties.

Reviewed by: 

“I am so tired of being Alice in Wonderland.”
—Alice Liddell