J. W. Nicklaus

J. W. Nicklaus maintains his own personal space between the soul and soft machine in the arid southwest amongst the snowbirds and the Arizona Diamondbacks.

After graduating with an Associate of Arts in Journalism and Photography, and a Bachelors of Science in Telecommunications, he’s spent the better part of 20 years experiencing life and working in trades as varied as a small advertising firm to a litigation service bureau.

Two poems of his have been published in anthologies, and he maintains a blog (avomnia.wordpress.com) and a website which contains further articles about the craft of writing as well as his published poems.

Books by J. W. Nicklaus

Book Reviews by J. W. Nicklaus

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“There are many volumes that discuss in almost excruciating depth players’ stats, off field antics, amazing plays, and endless facts about the game itself.

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“. . . George Washington’s Secret Six is worthwhile reading.

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“. . . [strips] away the mythological haze surrounding one of our most important founding fathers.” 

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“Do we really need another book about the Civil War? Mr. Fleming makes a solid, compelling case in the affirmative.”

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“David Leeming peels layers from the myth and views his subject from a number of perspectives.”

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“To say Master of the Mountain is compelling would be to understate the value of Henry Wiencek’s scholarship.”

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“Bob Berman takes every long forgotten notion we thought we understood about the Sun and serves it up fresh . . .”

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“Trading Manny is, of course, about the heartbreak two fans feel when their love for baseball is betrayed.

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“Walter Isaacson’s biography certainly won’t be the last written about this extraordinary corporate icon, but it establishes itself as the gold standard. Mr.

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“Hemingway’s Boat: Everything He Loved in Life, And Lost, 1934–1961 is, in the sculpting hands of Paul Hendrickson, as dramatic, as expressive, as human as Hemingway himself was.”

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“A Talk In The Park is baseball as you’ve never read it—and how you always remembered hearing it.”

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You may wonder what a stylebook is.

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It’s okay to giggle like a schoolboy at the title—even the author acknowledges so in his introduction to The Secret History of Balls: The Stories Behind the Things We Love to Catch, Whack, Thro

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What’s red, round, and dirty when it’s brand new? Would you believe . . . a major league baseball? You might think it’s white, right?

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Liberty. One word—an idea, really.

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Never work with animals or children, or so goes the old axiom. The Chimp Who Loved Me—And Other Slightly Naughty Tales of Life with Animals is, as the title implies, about animals.

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Mortified. Dismayed.

The more I read and learn about early American history, the more resonant these two words become in relation to my own deficient education.

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What are the Northern Lights? Why might a tornado demolish one house and leave another unscathed?

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I only recently learned that my father played second base when he was in Little League; I was, justifiably, cordoned off in left field.

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As words for this review materialize upon the screen, Mötley Crüe’s Greatest Hits’ crunches and screams in the background, raucous and direct in the commutation from auditory to written form.

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It is with regret that we have removed this review due to the many questions raised bout the veracity of the book.



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Providence has its signature upon everything of value, tangible and intangible.

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“I am only human, although I regret it.”
—Mark Twain

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“The darker the night the bolder the lion.” —Theodore Roosevelt