A. J. Kirby

A. J. Kirby is the multi award-winning author of short fiction, two novels (Bully, and The Magpie Trap), and two novellas (The Call of the Sea, and Perfect World), as well as a volume of collected works (Mix Tape). His work has been described as “like trying to get to sleep after drinking too many vodka red bulls,” his trademark strong narrative voice often “fierce and impassioned,” sometimes brutal but often tempered with a consoling note of humor.

Mr. Kirby has been published in anthologies (including Legend Press’s Eight Rooms, and Ten Journeys, Nemonymous 8: Cone Zero, and Nemonymous 9: Cern Zoo from Megazanthus Press, and Graveside Tales’ Fried: Fast Food Slow Deaths), print journals (Sein und Werden, Jupiter 24, Skrev Press, and Champagne Shivers), and webzines (New Voices in Fiction, A Fly in Amber, Pumpkin, The Second Hand, Pages of Stories magazine, U.S. Short Story Library, and Underground).

Mr. Kirby is also a food/nightlife critic for a magazine based in his hometown of Leeds (U.K.) and a soccer correspondent for the Professional Footballer’s Association.

Book Reviews by A. J. Kirby

Reviewed by: 

“. . . the series’ crowning glory, its pinnacle achievement.”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . an astonishing, breathtaking, and harrowing read.”

It’s all about momentum with Cartwheel by Jennifer duBois.

Reviewed by: 

“. . . a fascinating read—sometimes terrifying, often witty, always engagingly written.”

Reviewed by: 

“Levels of Life is heartfelt and raw . . . angry . . . witty . . . always memorable.”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . that rarest of creatures: an intelligent and original lycanthrope novel. Perhaps the great werewolf novel.”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . [a] mean machine of a novel . . . an instant classic.”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . compulsive and engaging, . . . crackles with energy and wit . . .”

Reviewed by: 

It would be maddeningly easy to begin my review of Herman Koch’s The Dinner like this:

Reviewed by: 

“. . . in How Literature Saved My Life, Mr. Shields has written a great book—and one that matters.”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . what Lynn Coady shows is a different kind of truth, an artistic truth . . .”

Reviewed by: 

“Tom Wolfe has still got it. . . He presents the American Dream as it is today. And he does it very, very well.”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . daring . . . a story of the Promethean folly of human beings. . . . visceral . . . grueling . . .”

Chase Novak’s newly born Breed is not cute.

Reviewed by: 

“Wish You Were Here is a novel full of yearning for tradition and history. For what England has lost.”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . it’s hard not to love this book.”

Reviewed by: 

“. . . a heavenly book, a stellar achievement by a debut novelist . . . gleams with vitality, . . . sparkles with wit.”

Reviewed by: 

“With works such as Isaac: A Modern Fable under his belt, Ivan Goldman may not be a ‘minor novelist’ for very much longer.”

Reviewed by: 

“Vulture Peak is a modern morality tale with all the requisite bells and whistles and much more: a salutary warning for the Internet age.

Reviewed by: 

“The Sense of an Ending is something of a minor masterpiece.”

Reviewed by: 

“Sorry has all the ingredients to make it a compulsive read. It’s slick, chock full of twists and turns, and dripping with narrative thrust and intrigue. . . .

Reviewed by: 

“Ali Smith’s There But For The is a thoroughly modern book that plays with form, structure, and language, never allowing the reader to settle for comfortable passive reading; ultim

Reviewed by: 

“In Last Man in Tower, it is immediately apparent that author Adiga’s writing has matured.

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“Floating Staircase deserves to stand alongside a Stephen King or a Dean Koontz—at their best. . . .

Reviewed by: 

“Good writing can be so revolutionary that often it is not recognized in its own time.

Reviewed by: 

“The Submission is a brave novel. An unflinchingly honest novel. It is social reportage but also a piece of authentic art in its own right.

Reviewed by: 

“. . . head-spinning, rope-clutching, canvas gnashing . . . a hilarious contemporary farce, . . . genuinely hilarious. . . .

Author(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

“It must be said that behind all the bluster, Mr. Kleier’s message is one that everyone should know and live by . . .”

Reviewed by: 

Take note of this novel as you’re sure to hear about it again over the coming months.

Reviewed by: 

“A sad tale’s best for winter.”
The Winter’s Tale (II.i.25), by William Shakespeare

Reviewed by: 

On May 11 2010, the curtain well and truly rose on Stefanie Pintoff’s burgeoning crime fiction career, pulling her out of the shadows and into the limelight.

Reviewed by: 

Michael Connelly has a legitimate claim to being one of the greatest living writers of police procedurals.

Reviewed by: 

Pirates. Fast cars. Billionaire playboys. Boats. Guns and gun-smugglers. Explosions “fifty-five times more powerful than the bomb . . . dropped on Hiroshima.” Sex. Helicopters. Terrorists.

Reviewed by: 

On May 11 2010, the curtain well and truly rose on Stefanie Pintoff’s burgeoning crime fiction career, pulling her out of the shadows and into the limelight.

Reviewed by: 

Reviewed by: 

Reviewed by: 

“We hear of crimes so horrific they provoke anger and disbelief in equal proportions . . . These are the ugly manifestations of a society that is becoming unworthy of that name.”

Reviewed by: 

The successful franchise series can be a double-edged sword for the ambitious writer.

Reviewed by: 

Inheritance: n.
1. The act of inheriting.
2. The biological process of genetic transference of characteristics from parents to offspring.

Reviewed by: 

“History is a nightmare from which I’m trying to awake.”

                                                             —James Joyce

Reviewed by: 

Reviewed by: 

Imagine 1984 as narrated by Holden Caulfield. Imagine Caliban performing a star turn in a Ken Kesey’s One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.

Reviewed by: 

Yann Martel writes a great pear. A mouth watering pear. In his hands, the pear is transformed into something else, something beautiful, something that can barely be contained on the page.