Grace Lichtenstein

Grace Lichtenstein is an author, book critic, and former New York Times Rocky Mountains bureau chief and reporter. Her book reviews on music, sports, adventure, literature and the American West have appeared in the New York Times, Washington Post, TheMillions.com, PopMatters.com, and NYCityWoman.com. She was the book critic for Music Media Monthly, as well as a founding editor of Just Sports for Women.

Her books include A Long Way, Baby: Behind The Scenes in Women's Pro Tennis; Desperado; Machisma: Women and Daring; and Musical Gumbo: the Music of New Orleans (written with Laura Dankner).

A member of the Authors Guild and the National Book Critics Circle, she is on the board of Bike New York, the not-for-profit organization that promotes safe cycling through education and events like the TD Five Boro Bike Ride. She is an avid cyclist, skier, and Mets fan. She lives in Manhattan.

Book Reviews by Grace Lichtenstein

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David Foster Wallace, a competitive tennis player in his youth, once wrote that “Top athletes are compelling because they embody the comparison-based achievement we Americans revere—fastest

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There is a good book lurking within this well-meaning jumble of anecdotes and once-boldface names.

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Hard as it is to believe, the iPhone is a decade old. It seems as though everyone has been talking on one, walking head down staring at one, or taking photos with one forever.

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Some espionage writers follow the same character from one book to the next— John Le Carré’s George Smiley, for instance.

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One of the pleasant interludes in the Cold War was the ecstatic reception that Van Cliburn received at Moscow’s first-ever Tchaikovsky International Piano Competition in 1958.

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The visceral impact of Julianne Pachico’s prose . . . is enough to convince a reader that disorder is only a rock, a knock, or a gunshot away.”

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Pulitzer Prize-winning former Washington Post reporter and journalism professor Glenn Frankel has found a new calling as an incisive interpreter of classic Western films.

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“So many places, so little time,” warns the back cover of the third edition of this massive survey bursting with wonders throughout North America. Indeed, it’s hard to know where to begin.

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“Connelly himself only gets better with age.”

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Oral history can be a tough genre to enjoy; it is by nature disjointed and often suggests an author is lazy.

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One definition of heroine, according to my dictionary is “a woman who is admired for great or brave acts or fine qualities.” Note the word brave; it is crucial.