Geri Spieler

Geri Spieler is a journalist and investigative reporter. Her specialty is to take the buzz on the streets and turn it into investigative stories that are not being covered anywhere else.

She has written for such publications as the Los Angeles Times, San Francisco Chronicle, and Forbes. Ms. Spieler is also a book reviewer for the New York Journal of Books, the premiere online book review site that publishers actively seek for their authors.

She was the founder and editor of Electronic Commerce News, a technology journal published by Phillips Business Information, which led to an eight-year assignment as a Research Director and Analyst for the Gartner Group, an international technology advising company.

In her capacity as a reporter, Ms. Spieler met and corresponded with the would-be assassin Sara Jane Moore. Palgrave Macmillan published her award-winning book, Taking Aim at the President: The Remarkable Story of the Woman Who Shot Gerald Ford, in January 2009. Sundance Film director Robinson Devore is making a documentary film about Sara Jane Moore’s life.

Ms. Spieler is a member of the National Book Critics Circle. Currently she is working on her next book about San Francisco Values.

Book Reviews by Geri Spieler

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A book so graphic, so heart wrenching, and so passionate demands the craft of a skilled author.

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The Sixth Extinction is a dense, scientific text. . . .

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The Black Book is a sad account of a man in misery.

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Mention the news company, Al Jazeera, and it’s likely the response will not be without a strong opinion of the Qatar-based news network.

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“Gun Guys is smart and informative—an education for anyone the slightest bit curious about why gun owners are so passionate about their guns.”

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“. . . an excellent book for those interested in the journalism greats, both past and reasonably contemporary. It should be required reading for journalism majors.”

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It is delightful that a respected linguist would take up the challenge of writing about an inelegant word that has become a staple of our spoken language.

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“There is humor and personality in every paragraph of We’re with Nobody. The writing is intelligent, detailed, and intimate.

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“. . . stiff, awkward, and confusing with all of its redundant information. . . .

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“. . . thorough, thoughtful, and exceptionally well written. . . . Page One is a most encompassing volume on the issue of the future of journalism and newspapers. . . .

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“This biography is a comprehensive journal of Frederick Law Olmsted’s life written with great precision and exhaustive historical specifications; but these elements do not get in the way of

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With the title of this book, The Secret Book of CIA Humor, expectation is that this is a work of great insight into the high-level intellect of such an elite agency.

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Author George Friedman takes a very personal look at the next ten years in his new book, The Next Decade. He is clear and blunt in what he sees as the United States becoming an empire at t

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It is difficult to sort out how much of Gray Lady Down is personal or an objective assessment of the New York Times by William McGowan.

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If there were a “Watchman” to protect us from danger, he would be shaking his rattle vigorously right now.

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Jeffrey Kaye’s timely book, Moving Millions: How Coyote Capitalism Fuels Global Immigration, focuses on the impact of immigration worldwide.  The author uses the term “migrant” to describe i

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It's not often we get to hear the story from the victim of a serial killer as we do in this sensitively written account of Sanford Clark, the nephew of serial killer Gordon Stewart Northcott.

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As the debate rolls on about Immigration Reform in the United States, as Congress considers President Obama’s vision to design a “Path to Citizenship,” and as Arizona tightens re

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It would be easy to write an Obama-backlash book using buzzwords and cliché ridden accounts of the right-wing talk show blather-babblers.

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(Center for Comparative Immigration, February 2010)

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What could be a more contentious issue today than the conflict surrounding our border with Mexico?

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In Big Girls Don’t Cry: The Election that Changed Everything for American Women, Rebecca Traister follows key women involved in the 2008 Presidential election, to tell the story “about the country