Gabriel Constans

Gabriel Constans has 13 books published in North America and has written for magazines, newspapers, and journals in the United States, Europe, Africa, and Asia. He works as a freelance journalist, editor, and writer.

Dr. Constans also provides counseling for trauma survivors and those who have experienced death, loss, and/or human rights abuses. He is an advisor to the Rwandan Orphan’s Project and is a board member for the Ihangane Project (in Rwanda).

Book Reviews by Gabriel Constans

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Sarah Grimké grew up in a slave-owning Charleston South Carolina family.

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“In-depth philosophical essays and visionary science dressed up as a novel.”

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“What She Left Behind screams with authenticity, depth, and understanding.

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“. . . a real kicker.”

For writer, speaker, and “Warrior Mom of five” Darah Zeledon, life’s joys and calamities have been abundant and enlightening.

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“Ruth Ozeki’s A Tale for the Time Being is one of the best novels of 2013—and will surely inhabit that position for years to come.”

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“. . . a satisfying, savory dish that should be served alongside the best in contemporary multicultural fiction.”

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“. . . deserves a bright spotlight on the literary stage . . .”

Seventeen-year-old Christine Bolz works as a domestic for the Bauermans in a small German Village.

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“. . . glimpses of insight and understanding . . . ”

It is hopeful that Belfast Girls is a prelude to greater things to come.

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“These stories torment readers with the possibilities and unfulfilled potential . . .”

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“Three Weeks in December is a reviewer’s dream come to life.

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“What Doesn’t Kill Us is accessible for all readers, . . . Well worth the time to read, digest, and utilize in one’s daily life.”

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“In Chike and the River, young readers get an intimate look at African life, learn about the Niger River, and connect with Chike as if he is their own sibling.

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Netsuke is a fastener that secures the cord at the top of the sash, which holds traditional Japanese robes together. They became great objects of artistic expression.

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The revolution to which this book refers is the widespread use and acceptance of mindfulness and how it has been applied throughout society.

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Suspensful, spectacular, and searing are not adjectives one would use to describe The Calligrapher’s Secret. Intriguing, intelligent, and multifaceted are far more accurate to convey what

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It is an intriguing idea: How would we live if all of our wounds were made visible by an illuminating light that shone from every cut, bruise, malady, or illness?

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“To rest in the present is a state of magical simplicity, although attainment of this state is not as simple as it sounds.”

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If Specters were as good as its opening line “The valley was full of ghosts” it could have been intriguing, but it is not.

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Steve Martin has been successful with most everything he touches or puts his mind to.

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If you enjoy vain, idle, narcissistic characters similar to those in The Great Gatsby, then pick up Martin Amis’s The Pregnant Widow and put yourself inside the head of Keith Near

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FIRST-TIME AUTHOR WRITES INSIDER’S VIEW OF NEWSPAPER BUSINESS would be the headline for The Imperfectionists, which begins each chapter with a different heading (some humorous and others m

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She did it!  She really did it!  Ms.

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As Mma Ramotswe and her friend sat together having red bush tea, “She closed her eyes.

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The Boy With the Cuckoo-Clock Heart has more metaphors than a million-piece mega-puzzle that artfully fits together as an exquisite literary masterpiece.

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Fatima Bhutto has a unique perspective. In fact, she is the only person in the world who could write this story—and thank goodness she is.

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If you thought it was impossible to tell a torturous tale about torture with grace, depth, insight, and compassion, then you must read In The Company of Angels by Thomas E. Kennedy.

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Right from the start, you know what's going to happen. The short paragraph on the back cover gives the ending away without saying it.

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Reading this book will change someone else’s life, because once you’ve become aware of the persistent and pervasive enslavement, rape, abuse, torture, and neglect of women in the world and how to c

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Eddie Signwriter is a book about choices—personal, interpersonal and communal.