Debra Leigh Scott

Debra Leigh Scott is a writer, playwright, screenwriter, dramaturge, arts administrator, and educator. Her short story collection, Other Likely Stories, was published by Sowilo Press in June 2010.

Her novel, Piety Street, the first novel of a trilogy, is forthcoming from New Door Books.

Her plays have been performed and showcased in venues such as The New Light Festival of Green Light Arts, the Shubin ArtFest, and the Philadelphia Fringe Festival.

Ms. Scott has written several short screenplays and is currently working on a book/documentary project called ’junct: The Trashing of Higher Ed. in America.

As Founding Director of Hidden River Arts, she oversees literary competitions, readings, educational outreach, and the newly launched Hidden River Publishing.

She is also planning the launch of several new projects through Hidden River: a yearly arts and music conference, and several overseas writing retreat activities— one to Havana and the other to Dublin. 

As an arts and education activist, Ms. Scott has lobbied, written, and spoken on behalf of issues surrounding pay equity for university educators, homeschooling, special education, and alternative learning options, as well as the importance of arts in our schools.

Hidden River: hiddenriver.com

’Junct: junctrebellion.com

 

Books by Debra Leigh Scott

Book Reviews by Debra Leigh Scott

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“I’d always tried to seek the truth and to faithfully record the spontaneous overflow of accidents that life is.

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As someone who teaches humanities courses at the university level, I am often in despair at the superficiality of understanding my students have regarding Shakespeare. 

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“a compelling read, an unflinching exploration of one of life’s most inexplicable horrors.” 

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American Goulash tells Stephanie Yuhas’s childhood story with humor, pathos, and love.”

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“Greenstein weaves a story of past and present in a way that creates a sense of timelessness.”

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“Ultimately, bravery, love and hope are celebrated in The Fifty-First State, a state that is imagined, a state in which a better life is possible.”

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“Pinsky’s conclusion of the Morgan case is endorsed by a good number of her surviving family members; but there are law enforcement officers who . . .  vehemently disagree.

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“Explore Mr. Gray's earlier works since this one is clearly not one of his strongest.”

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“In The Homegoing we enter this world as outsiders, but through Michael Olin-Hitt’s tender revelations we experience a sense of coming home.”

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“Even if you are not a regular reader of fantasy fiction, you may well enjoy this collection. Mr. Powers is a talented writer.

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“So I will say it in simple language: Buy this book. Read this book. It is masterful. It is one of the best short story collections published this year.

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“Sadly, the elements that would have made this a more compelling novel remain missing. That which we are hoping to understand, unfortunately, still remains unsaid.”

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“. . . the kind of book that you can read best at a leisurely pace, enjoying the slower rhythms of this literary ‘people watching.’”

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Faith is a story about the many ways we can create belief systems and trust structures, and the even greater number of ways that those systems and structures can be threatened and destroye

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How might a woman harvest meaning from the rich and devastating complexities of her life? In The Late Interiors, Marjorie Sandor explores this question.

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The Islamic Golden Age is traditionally dated from the middle of the 8th century to the Mongol invasion in the middle of the 13th century.

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Light Lifting by Alexander MacLeod is a muscular collection of short stories. That is to say, the collection is filled with physicality of all sorts.

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What happens when an urban dweller attempts to live a more sustainable and authentic life? Chaos. Near financial ruin. Hilarity. And, finally, triumph.

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To those used to the utter lack of respect given to artists in contemporary times, especially in America, the topic of Mr. Volkov’s book may seem puzzling.

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Millions of words of have been dedicated to the discussion of World War II, its causes, its horrors and its aftermath.

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Curtis Smith is a wonderful storyteller.

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Degrees of Elevation: Short Stories of Contemporary Appalachia brings together 17 gifted writers whose voices are as unique and striking as the region about which they write.