Christopher Zoukis

Christopher Zoukis, an award winning incarcerated writer, is the author of College for Convicts: The Case for Higher Education in American Prisons (McFarland & Co., 2014) and the Prison Education Guide (Prison Legal News Publishing, 2016). He regularly contributes to The Huffington Post, Prison Legal News, and the New York Daily News, along with a number of other print and digital media outlets.

Today he is successfully working on a Bachelor's Degree in Interdisciplinary Studies (Business/Law) from Adams State University. Following his 2016 graduation, he plans to attend Adams State University's MBA program.

Mr. Zoukis regularly advises attorneys, prison consultants, and fellow prisoners about legal issues and federal regulations governing the Federal Bureau of Prisons operations. Upon release he plans to attend law school and become a federal criminal defense attorney.

He can be found online at http://www.prisoneducation.com, http://www.prisonlawblog.com, and http://www.christopherzoukis.com.

Book Reviews by Christopher Zoukis

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The Eighth Amendment to the United States Constitution prohibits cruel and unusual punishment at the hands of the government.

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“The criminal justice system is in need of a seismic shift, and Kelley, Pitman, and Streusands' proposal is exactly the kind of major change needed.”

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Teaching teenagers is a calling. Despite limited social respect and wages that sometimes border on mere subsistence, dedicated professionals heed the call. The job is not easy.

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Famed 18th century jurist William Blackstone once said, "It is better that ten guilty persons escape than that one innocent suffer." Theoretically, this is a bedrock principle of American criminal

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“Prison Grievances unique combination of graphic novel and self-help book should be on every prisoner's bookshelf.”

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“provides a broad and comprehensive framework from which anyone can gain an understanding of the powerful forces that drive the criminal justice system.”

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“A must-read for any educator or anyone interested in better understanding the transcendental power of higher education.”

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The body of scholarship dedicated to analyzing, understanding, and changing America's enormous carceral complex is growing fast.

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“a refreshing look at the causes of mass incarceration . . . a must-read for anyone involved in the criminal justice reform movement.”

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“College for prisoners saves money and provides great net benefits to the prisoner and the community.”

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As a somewhat jaded and world-weary incarcerated writer, rarely do I read something that makes me really mad.

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In 1852 Charles Dickens said of solitary confinement, "I hold this slow and daily tampering with the mysteries of the brain, to be immeasurably worse than any torture of the body: and because its g

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Habeas corpus is a remedy of last resort for prisoners. Used by state and federal inmates alike, it is often the final opportunity to challenge the legality of a criminal conviction or sentence.

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Fans of Dwayne Michael Carter, Jr.—also known as Lil Wayne and Weezy—will want to pick up his new journal, Gone ’Til November.

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The For Beginners series of graphic nonfiction books take on complicated subjects in an authoritative but accessible and entertaining manner.

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Criminal justice reform is on the political and social agenda in a way that hasn't been seen in several decades.

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As the nation comes to grips with the incarceration boom of the last several decades, sociologists, criminologists, and other experts have begun to closely examine the collateral consequences broug

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"Prisoners," wrote Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy, "retain the essence of human dignity. . . .

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Sociologists, criminologists, and other scholars regularly study and debate what works about the American criminal justice system and what doesn't.

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One of the most significant pains of imprisonment is being cut off from the outside world. While this is very much a physical segregation, it is also a mental and informational one.

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When the average American thinks of prison, she will often draw a blank. Sure, prisons are bad places filled with lawbreakers and violence, but specifics are often few and far between.

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The American criminal justice system has long wrestled with evolving societal and scientific understandings about how best to deal with crime and criminals. Should we punish or rehabilitate?