Chris Beakey

Chris Beakey is the author of Fatal Option, to be published in hardcover by Post Hill Press and distributed by Simon & Schuster in February of 2017, and Double Abduction, a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award. He writes from his homes in Washington, DC, and Lewes, Delaware. He shares short stories and novel reviews at www.blog.chrisbeakey.com.

Books by Chris Beakey

Book Reviews by Chris Beakey

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“Readers who relish thrillers with brisk pacing and compelling characters will rank this as one of their all-time favorite books.”

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“Stevens certainly raises the bar . . .”

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The Girl Before will appeal greatly to fans of psychological suspense, even more to those who appreciate the chills of a good haunted house story.”

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What would it take to destroy everything you appear to value in your life?

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Ultimately the people who love Swanson’s work will remember . . .

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There’s a strange little boy who appears twice in Michael Koryta’s Rise the Dark.

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In the 1986 film The Morning After, Jane Fonda stars as Alex Sternbergen, a once-heralded movie star on a downward career slide.

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Tens of millions of Americans live in suburbs, so it’s not surprising to see so many readers gravitating toward stories that happen there. The literary crowd loved the way John Cheever wrote them.

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Avid thriller readers are experiencing the whirlwind of a trend toward releases featuring women who are “unreliable narrators.” That trend makes sense from a publishing point of view given the succ

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Thriller readers who yearn for intrigue, swift pacing, and surreal happenings will enjoy every word of Steve Mosby’s The Reckoning on Cane Hill.

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Commanding a spectacular hilltop view of Washington, DC, since 1855, St. Elizabeths Hospital has been both a sanctuary for the mentally ill and a treatment center for the criminally insane.

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Doug Johnstone’s The Jump begins with two sentences that depict a sadness that’s unthinkable until you’re a mother or father who’s forced to confront it: