Birgit W. Patty

Birgit W. Patty has studied the eight limbs of yoga since 2000. She practices the Sahaj Marg (Natural Path) system of Raja yoga, as well as Won and Tibetan Buddhist meditations. Ms. Patty also studies Kundalini yoga has completed a course in Nuad Boran (Thai Yoga Therapy) for yoga practitioners and bodyworkers. She is registered with the Yoga Alliance and is a certified Integral Yoga teacher.

Ms. Patty is committed to yogic living and to teaching techniques for an integrated yoga practice, primarily concentrating on Hatha yoga.
She is the proprietor of Apex Yogic Living, a studio in historic downtown Apex, NC. She reviews books about yoga postures, breathing techniques, meditation, schools/traditions of yoga, yogic philosophy, yoga therapy, and yoga research for the New York Journal of Books.

After a 30-year career in marketing and communications in the corporate, agency and non-profit arenas, Ms. Patty now works independently as a marketing editor and content developer.
She is a current member of the Yoga Alliance, the Integral Yoga Teachers Association, the International Association of Yoga Therapists, and the International Association of Business Communicators.

Birgit Patty lost her fight against cancer in November 2015. She was a flawless reviewer and tremendous person with immense generosity of spirit and will be greatly missed.

Book Reviews by Birgit W. Patty

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In Yoga at Home: Inspiration for Creating Your Home Practice, author Linda Sparrowe presents 55 yogis who open their homes and hearts to offer tips for readers who want to discover their o

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“masterfully told, phenomenal story of a little-known but highly influential life.”

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In ancient times, the sage Patanjali set forth the Yoga Sutras, an eight-fold approach for living which encompasses ethics in society, personal ethics, bodily posture, breath control, sense withdra

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“highly recommended as a way to create healthy habits for a more peaceful, happy life.”

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For yogis who seek a deeper connection with their practice, here is a clear path toward physical, mental, and spiritual practice . . .”

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“For lawyers (and others) who want to improve their state of mind, feel healthier, be more effective, and experience better work-life balance, Yoga for Lawyers is recommended.”

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“Creating the habit of mindfulness can result in a sense of calm, focus, joy, and contentment.”

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In Restorative Yoga for Life, author Gail Grossman aims to help the reader feel at ease in the body, recover from illness or physical injury, and gain a sense of balance and well-being.

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“Yoga for Cancer sets out to help people live longer, healthier and happier lives.”

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Yoga for Breast Care is recommended for women who want to take a positive approach to developing a balanced yoga practice that they can continue with confidence for a lifetime of

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“Ms. Isaacs tells us about Eastern teachers trained by yogic masters.

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In Pick Your Yoga Practice author Meagan McCrary explores several “styles” of yoga.

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“. . . an excellent reference manual for yoga teachers, experienced students, and yoga therapists.”

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“A practice that helps coordinate body, energy, and mind while making us more balanced and free from tension is immensely important,” writes Chögyal Namkhai Norbu, author of Tibetan Yoga of Mov

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“If a yoga practice is devoid of inquiry into the nature of mind or devoid of real self-reflection, is it really yoga?”

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Thousands of years ago, the sage Patanjali set forth the Yoga Sutras, a compilation of yogic principles for living outlined in an ashta-anga (eight-limbed) approach.

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“The Enlightened Brain is beneficial for anyone who feels stuck in a forest of imbalance and wants to ‘cut a path to a better place,’ as Dr. Hanson says.

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“Why Meditate? is recommended for people who want a meditation practice that is compatible with professional and family life. It’s for people who, as Mr.

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“Yoga Heart is highly recommended for people who will not only read the lines for enjoyment, but also use them for contemplation and right action in life.

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“Because trauma affects the body’s physiology, and because traumatic memories are often stored somatically, leaders in the field are increasingly insisting that trauma treatment must incorporate th

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“Zen means for a man to behold his own fundamental nature.”
—Ni Tsan, 14th century Chinese master painter, poet, and calligrapher

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Twenty years ago, the body was “forbidden territory” for psychologists.

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Various Eastern masters began introducing their yogic teachings in the West in the 1800s. From those dozen or so lineages, myriad Western methodologies have multiplied.

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There was a turning point in author Cameron Alborzian’s life when he decided to change his role in the material world forever.

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“If the man doesn’t believe as we do, we say he is a crank, and that settles it. I mean, it does nowadays, because now we can’t burn him.” —Mark Twain

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On the cover of The Mirror of Yoga, there is a photographic demonstration of Gomukhasana, cow-face pose, shot against the infinite sky.

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A month before he left this life in 1989 at the age of 101, yoga master Sri Tirumalai Krishnamacharya told author A. G. Mohan what is most important in life: “Arogya. Ayus.

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It’s simple: stretching is essential for well being. Understanding that thought is easy. Regularly stretching, however, can be a challenge; and this book is here to help.