Nonfiction

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“City of Fortune: How Venice Ruled the Seas is a fantastically fast-paced historical narrative and a welcome read. Mr.

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“In The Polar Bear Scientists, author Peter Lourie makes a fascinating and compelling case for the importance of studying polar bears.

“The thesis set forth by Stephen Fritz in Ostkrieg is so simple and compelling that it merits consideration even by those who have studied the topic for years.”

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“There is humor and personality in every paragraph of We’re with Nobody. The writing is intelligent, detailed, and intimate.

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“. . . 182 pages of bacterial wonderment. . . . Dr. Wassenaar explains how the intestinal bacterial microflora of a fruit fly (affected by diet) drives mating preference.

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“The Ecstasy of Influence is a book worth reading—it redraws the map of popular culture and, in so doing, pushes us beyond the confines of our comfortable minds, out into the larger world

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“In Pursuit of the Traveling Salesman describes the problem of creating the most efficient solution to computing the shortest travel route—visiting each city on a list and returnin

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“In the Spring of 2012 a new novel from Edmund White entitled Jack Holmes and His Friend, is upcoming. The reader hopes that with this new work of fiction Mr.

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“While not exactly an ‘Introduction to the Wines of Argentina’ book, The Vineyard at the End of the World is nonetheless a good starter book about the wines of Argentina, giving th

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“Simon Doonan seems to be living in a world of yesterday when it comes to gay consciousness, gay accomplishments, and human (gay and non-gay) rights to the point that, when he mentions arti

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“Once you start, it may be hard to stop. Even a first skim through the book will likely lead to many pages marked for further testing . . .

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“How the Beatles Destroyed Rock and Roll is a superbly thoughtful, inclusive, and intellectually challenging look at American popular music and culture from the turn of the 20th ce

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“Thinking, Fast and Slow is an engaging comprehensive seminar in print, taught by a wise, careful, deliberate thinker. . . .

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“Mr. Henaghan does shine light on the confusion regarding the multitude of patient safety organizations and makes health care system simplification sound attractive.

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“Ms. Herz indeed proves her point about ‘benign masochism.’ We are disgusted by disgust. And we can’t stop reading about it.”

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“As an academic study in 18th century music and use of castrati, Ms.

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