Nonfiction

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If a business owner is trying to figure out how to use the Internet for growing his or her business and obtaining more clients, Peggy McColl has the prescription in this book.

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The cover is striking, a rich blue, defining a solitary cloud.

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“Maybe he realized . . . the utter aloneness of the fighter—despite the hangers-on, the crowds, the adulation, it was a pitiless profession.”

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Raphaël Kies is a researcher in political science at the University of Luxembourg; co-founder of the E-democracy center, Switzerland; and a member of Réseau de Démocratie Électronique, France.

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From the title of the book, one might think that this will be some sappy tale or series of tales about some ladies and what their favorite dresses mean to them. That is certainly not what you get.

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In Mary Tudor: Princess, Bastard, Queen, Anna Whitelock sets out to offer a picture of English first Queen Regnant as something other than the “weak-willed failure as so often rendered by tradition

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This year’s Slap-In-The-Face-Get-A-Grip-Bub Award for business books goes to Jeffrey Pfeffer, business professor at Stanford and author of nine volumes on organization dynamics.

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You Already Know How to Be Great reaches beyond coaches to managers, human resource professionals, teachers, parents—anyone whose role requires them to give performance feedback or periodi

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Cowboy Conservatism is an illuminating history of modern conservatism in the state of Texas—a conservatism that spread throughout the United States, but that began with a bullet that took

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In many ways, The Blue Chair Jam Cookbook couldn’t be more perfectly timed.

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There is a thin line between whining and problem solving. It is unfortunate that Mooney and Kirshenbaum never crossed that line. In fact, they may never have seen the line in the first place.

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Providence has its signature upon everything of value, tangible and intangible.

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Take a quick skim through Supper for a Song, and your first thought may be, “Wow, songs sure must cost more in Britain.” This book will pull readers in with its attractive layout and photo

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Houghton, Mifflin, Harcourt, April 2009

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Eloquent Books, June 2009

A Picture Book That Encourages Children to Believe In Themselves

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Those of us who grew up in the age of early television sometimes wonder whatever happened to this or that character.

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If there’s one thing that doesn’t quite compute, it’s reading about the nation’s dysfunctional economy while one of the greatest business resources of our time–the Internet–is changing the nature o

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“I have always preferred,” wrote the French 19th century author Anatole France, “the folly of passion to the wisdom of indifference.”

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With multinational corporations firmly ensconced as the evil raptors of our economy, small businesses have now become the red, white, and blue of a new commercial patriotism.

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