Nonfiction

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“Alarming and timely, Justice Failed is a must-read for anyone hoping to better understand the reality of modern American criminal justice.”

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If you were expecting a visual and written history of this heritage brand and its products you might be sorely disappointed with Louis Vuitton: A Passion for Creation.

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“No other species puts so much effort into exploring imaginary territories, nor does it seem so determined to turn the make-believe into the real.”

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"This slender little book . . . is a treasure."

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Blind Injustice provides great insight into how wrongful convictions happen in a system designed to avoid them.”

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The way we conceive of art traditionally, and how it is intrinsically linked to drawing, design, and painting, owes its popularization, if not its origin, to Vasa

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Biographer James Thomas Flexner has called George Washington the “indispensable man” of the American Revolution.

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It’s a bit difficult to wrap your head around that fact that Fiorucci is celebrating its 50th anniversary.

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Breathing regulates our everyday experience. What if we could change our lives by changing our breathing?

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When a juvenile commits a crime, the constituents of the criminal justice system must answer a question: Is the kid a criminal, or is the criminal a kid?

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Historians, like archeologists, play an invaluable role uncovering all-but-forgotten people of the past, thus helping provide a better picture of the present.

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“Visually and intellectually stimulating.”

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It is a rare occurrence that any designer or brand has two books published, both of which are singularly devoted to their oeuvre, let alone a Generation X designer whose name is hardly one that fal

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Spanning a course of over 300 years (1277–early 1600s) and encompassing a legacy of no fewer than 50 Popes (Pope Nicholas III–Clement VIII), Art of Renaissance Rome provides a narrow cross

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It is easy to make war and very hard to make peace. The experience of the Allies after the Great War shows that a flawed peace will only lead to more war.

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“Readers will shout and stomp; snort and yell, while reading Nasty Women. It is the perfect weapon for dispensing gut-ripping vitriol in the privacy of your own mind.”

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What comes to mind with this book is the slogan used in the ’50s: “often imitated never duplicated.”

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“Art Up Close contains great variety, excellent selection, and attractive presentation: a wonderful way to teach art history.”

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“provides a fresh perspective on the strategic options each combatant faced as the once European war became truly global in 1941 . . .”

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“What better way could one take a journey in an easy chair?”

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Joan Marie Johnson’s new book Funding Feminism offers an important and accessible (if occasionally redundant) contribution to both academic and lay audiences interested in women’s history

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“exquisitely written, masterfully spoken from the heart.”

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“one can only hope that many more writers will tackle the methodology of untruth—well beyond Conway’s technique—during this bizarre and perilous political era.”

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“an important barometer of youth mental health and reminder of the insidious ways that technology can swiftly reshape society right under our noses.”

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Carrie Boretz’s Street is not just another collection of New York City photographs.

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