Designers, Muses & Personalities

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This is an exuberant and effervescent book that stretches beyond just shoes designed by Manolo Blahnik.

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London Uprising is as much a geography/real estate lesson as it is the story of the rise of the British fashion industry in its current state.

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Unquestionably, Yves Saint Laurent and Christian Dior are eternally and inextricably coupled in fashion history since it is a well known that YSL took the reins when Dior passed.

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This is the kind of fashion tome that has a distinction all its own within the genre of fashion books.

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A new year brings still one more book focused on the heritage brand of Dior but the real question is whether or not the main attraction is the brand or the brilliant illustrator whose images inhabi

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David Foy would like to have to the reader believe that this is a book about Victoria Beckham and her prodigious design talents, which have thrust her into the fashion limelight.

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Unquestionably the fashion landscape is scattered with heritage brands that have been reinvigorated and reimagined.

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It is safe to say that Taffin is everything one might expect and nothing like one could possibly have imagined.

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Think: clothing as theater and spectacle!”

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As any habitué of the fashion circuit will tell you, the most excitement happens off the catwalk and not during that 10 minute over the top display of a fashion designer’s latest collection.

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Coach: A History of New York Cool delivers far more than one expects especially if the reader is all about the glories of New York City as well as being a fan of the brand.

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The first issue that slaps you in the face is the title of this book, especially once you examine the table of contents in The New French Couture.

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Be ready to have the legacy that is Brigitte Bardot unfold right in front of your eyes.

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To say that Versace is a history of the brand is a tad misleading as the book is much more about Donatella Versace and the role she has played in the ascension of the brand.

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Olympia Le-Tan can be appreciated on many levels. The book can be so many different things to each reader depending on the reader’s fashion education or trend exposure.

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Castelbajac, the book, and Jean-Charles de Castelbajac, the designer, stand as reminders to those in fashion that this man was indeed a visionary in his prescient approach to fashion.

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There are two kernels of advice that immediately came to mind upon the completion of reading this book. Number one: Don’t judge a book by its cover. Number two: Always consider the source.

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Unlike its kissing cousin, LEVIS, the name Carhartt is not as ubiquitous, but as the title states it is a work in progress.

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What is immensely interesting about a book of this scope is who/what is included and then who/what is excluded.

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"The hardest working dog in fashion."
—from T magazine

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There seems to be no end to the attraction to and fascination with the designer Christian Dior as well as his maison, his oeuvre, and his clientele.

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The author of this book suffered an unspeakable horror unlike any of us might ever imagine or experience in our lifetimes.

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Apparently there are never enough pages, not enough illustrations nor enough photographs that are devoted to the illustrious and legendary designer, Coco Chanel.

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Couture Confessions is a book that should assessed based on two distinct points of view depending on the reading experience/history of each reader.

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The first thing that must be taken into account here is that Balenciaga: Master of Lace serves as a French/English catalogue from an exhibition of the same name which took place a

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