French

Reviewed by: 

“Compass educates us, even as we marvel at its obscurity.”

Reviewed by: 

Of all Mozart’s piano sonatas, No. 11, “Turkish March,” is the most unique. It’s also his best. And Mathias Énard seems to know why.

Author(s):
Translator(s):
Reviewed by: 

Nietzsche declared God was dead over a hundred years ago, but contemporary readers can’t get enough of religion.

Reviewed by: 

“[Lewinter’s] unique literary voice . . . is that of an obsessive, a philosopher, and a miniaturist.”

Author(s):
Translator(s):
Reviewed by: 

a fable about ideological extremism under an avant-garde skin.”

Reviewed by: 

Patrick Modiano goes beyond the checklist accuracies of historical fiction, fashioning a lush fever dream filled with glamor, mystery, and despair.”

Reviewed by: 

Michèle Audin's debut novel One Hundred Twenty-One Days is a story about mathematics and love.

Author(s):
Translator(s):
Reviewed by: 

a masterpiece of concision and pain. . . . a literary achievement . . .”

Reviewed by: 

“In a suspense novel that is the literary equivalent of Hitchcock’s Psycho, Lemaitre presents a harrowing look into the link between madness and evil.”

Reviewed by: 

The 19th arrondissement in Paris is a cosmopolitan melting pot district where multicultural citizens live, love, and worship alongside one another, enjoying Kosher sushi and kebabs, and different s

Reviewed by: 

“an effervescent book, comprised of two equally well-rounded stories . . .”

“if you really care about something in life, do whatever it takes not to lose it.”

Reviewed by: 

Venice, renown the world over for its beauty and riches, becomes the setting for Gabrielle Wittkop's Murder Most Serene.

Reviewed by: 

With age usually comes wisdom, and when waxing nostalgic, one usually sees the significance of youthful events in a new and understanding light.

Reviewed by: 

The new English translation of Patrick Modiano’s 2003 novel Paris Nocturne defies categorization.

Author(s):
Translator(s):
Reviewed by: 

Michel Houellebecq, the enfant terrible of French letters, is no longer an enfant and Submission is far from terrible, but his latest novel is, as usual, an even

Author(s):
Translator(s):
Genre(s):
Reviewed by: 

"Mirbeau's novel offers trenchant satire that will endure."